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March 21, 2019, 08:18:44 PM
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CAP Talk  |  Recent Posts
CAP Talk  |  Recent Posts
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 21 
 on: Yesterday at 04:12:09 PM 
Started by JayCraswell - Last post by Stonewall
Seriously want. Have some questions. Will call or email ASAP.

 22 
 on: Yesterday at 03:13:39 PM 
Started by glm705 - Last post by Toad1168
If anything, I would rather see the triangle design instead of the seal.  Not saying that I would do either, but IMHO it would look better.

 23 
 on: Yesterday at 11:36:37 AM 
Started by Luis R. Ramos - Last post by NIN
Didn't the Airbus that slammed into the woods and exploded at the Paris Air show in 1988 have some sort of software that said when wheels are down below a certain altitude it would "autoland"

Not exactly. According to the investigation & Airbus, a variety of factors combined to put a loaded airliner lower & slower than the pilots intended on a short runway that they weren't landing on, and the pilots didn't respond correctly.

The pilots, of course, say that the plane was at fault.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_France_Flight_296

 24 
 on: Yesterday at 08:35:09 AM 
Started by JayCraswell - Last post by Slim
I can vouch for this seller and his quality.
I purchased a 5317 and programming cable from him a year ago, both arrived as advertised and work just great.

 25 
 on: Yesterday at 07:11:01 AM 
Started by Luis R. Ramos - Last post by OldGuy
From my G1000 class - remember, the PIC has to fly the airplane, not the computer! American pilots have been drilled in this, foreign pilots not so much.

Problem is that it's SOP with the airlines to engage the autopilot when you're passing through 1000 feet agl.
You need the autopilot to be engaged so the Flight Management System can do it's thing. And it's the FMS through VNAV and LNAV plus the Autothrottles that normally flies the airplane. Hand flying is normally frowned upon unless there is a malfunction.
The FMS is preferred because it gives a smoother ride and is much more fuel efficient. The Mk1, Mod 0 Human isn't.
My class included multiple commercial and military pilots who actually indicated the opposite. YMMV.

 26 
 on: Yesterday at 12:43:51 AM 
Started by TarRiverRat - Last post by TarRiverRat
Thanks for the info.

Eric

 27 
 on: March 19, 2019, 11:13:31 PM 
Started by Jim Lahaie - Last post by Dwight Dutton
You cannot. If it is not in the regs then it is not allowed. Sorry.

CAPM 39-1, Page 110:
https://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/media/cms/M391_E6F33EAAEC28A.pdf
"10.7.23. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Patch. May be worn by individuals who have
satisfactorily completed CPR training, as awarded by a CPR-training agency whose training standards
meet the US Department of Transportation “National Guidelines for First Aid in Occupational Settings”.
Patches will only be worn while the member is current. Patch will be appropriate in size and appearance
for the uniform being worn and that authorized by the agency that completed the training. "

I guess I should have specified. You are correct for BDU and BBDU, But for ABU it is restricted.
Per "UPDATED_ABU_wear_instruction_24_Oct"

"Left Breast Pocket. One full color patch authorized in Attachment 8-1 through 8-4, with the
exception of the Emergency Services patches, Honor Guard Shield (attachment 8-4) and Ranger tabs, may be sewn
to the shirt centered on the lower portion of the left breast pocket between left and right edges and bottom of flap and
pocket of ABU shirt. One Service Badge shown in Attachment A6-1, may be worn in this position with the
exception of the National Staff Badge which is worn on the right pocket.
Right Breast Pocket. One full color patch authorized in Attachment 8-1 through 8-3, with the
exception of the Emergency Services patches and Ranger tabs, the Model Rocketry Patch, may be sewn to the shirt
centered on the lower portion of the right breast pocket between left and right edges and bottom of flap and pocket
of ABU shirt. The Unit/Organizational Patch and the National Staff Badge shown in attachment A6-1 are also
authorized to be worn in this position."

No mention of Paragraph 10.
I wish they would release the new Uniform regulations so this would be clarified (maybe), instead of having to look at several documents and trying to figure it out.

So after all that - left pocket, with your squadron patch on the right.

 28 
 on: March 19, 2019, 11:07:54 PM 
Started by Kayll'b - Last post by Dwight Dutton
"CAP" isn't going to do anything as an organization, per se.  "CAP" doesn't have any.

Units and members will add them to the pile of all the other obsolete stuff they have in their sheds, homes and meeting locations.

When I retired from the Army I gave all the tops to a paintball team, but I continued to wear my BDU pants.  Still have some.

 29 
 on: March 19, 2019, 09:58:22 PM 
Started by Luis R. Ramos - Last post by JayCraswell
Didn't the Airbus that slammed into the woods and exploded at the Paris Air show in 1988 have some sort of software that said when wheels are down below a certain altitude it would "autoland"
  I believe the pilot was doing a low pass so people could see the aircraft and... Disaster.

If what I've heard on the news is true there is some sort of stall detection auto correction computer code that auto dips the nose if stall is detected.  My question is why have a computer take over an event that is the first thing you learn (And have it hammered in over and over) during flight training.  And if the stall horn is coming on during a landing do you really want a machine taking the stick and pressing the nose down for you? 

If avionic software is written by the same level people as say Windows 10 where you have patch tuesday every month?  I would rather stick with a human pilot


 30 
 on: March 19, 2019, 09:44:46 PM 
Started by kdvthree - Last post by JayCraswell
How about a FLEX YAGI?
I designed (liberated the idea and scaled the antenna) a flex Yagi antenna that connects to the LPERs.  It only works in RECV mode where you move the antenna in a few 360s and look for the peak.  Which is good because I loath DF mode.  You get the same indication if your walking directly at the target or walking directly away from the target.  Plus its not good for close in and doesn't handle reflections well. I know I know its "easy" but no one has ever won our Wing Foxhunt (UDF) doing it in DF mode.

Or better yet turn the sensitivity way down and listen for the signal when every direction is noise except one.  I believe our german transplant CAP member told me that the dynamic range of human hearing is far better then your eyeballs squinting at the signal strength meter. I can report that doing it by sound seems to always put me on the correct cut (azmuth) when in an area with lots of reflections (hangers / other aircraft) 

It still fails if your dumb enough (Like me at a mission years ago) to stand under a power line where you just end up walking directly under the wire. 

Step 1 get out in the clear and get up as high as possible. Or ask for an Aircrew that knows how to do an electronic search.

1) Advantages are greater range. 

2) Sharper "cuts"

3) Its able to be bent in 20 different places. Like when your crashing through brush or the woods. It comes back into shape just give it a firm shake and it folds back into place.   You can also fold the elements and use velcro to hold them down so you can load it into a van without it taking up a bunch of space.

If you want an assembled and tested one I make them up in batches on a fairly regular basis.

Its made from PVC and chopped up lengths of metal measuring tape which is spring steel.  Painted green its what the whips on Army Packset radios such as the PRC-8, 9, 10, 77 etc all use.

I'm normally reachable at (505)  333-9301 and its ok to call late (say 11 PM CST)

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