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CAP Talk  |  Cadet Programs  |  Cadet Programs Management & Activities  |  Topic: New CAP Parent... Questions, Questions, Questions
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Author Topic: New CAP Parent... Questions, Questions, Questions  (Read 1568 times)
Alaric
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 756

« Reply #20 on: September 14, 2017, 11:46:44 AM »



Parents should always be involved and interested in what their cadets are doing, and ask all the questions they need to, but
the idea of a "Parental Advisory Council" is going to send a chill up the spine of anyone who reads it with experience in the program.

Not, again, with any intent on excluding parents, but there is so much to understanding the program, competing priorities for time, and
just general stress on staff who are all volunteers, that having less-informed people "advising" is just a bad idea.  For those who want to
be that involved, they should write a check, go to TLC, and roll up their sleeves.

Just to be clear, the parent council thing isn't my idea, it's already been on the radar apparently.  Even if it were ever adopted, I would see it only as a means to supplement and be a resource to the program, not run over it to make sure little Timmy is the star cadet. 

I've been a manager for more years than I care to remember, so I'm a big believer in consistency.  My interest is in knowing what "should" happen, as much as possible, so everyone gets the most from the program.  If "x" is supposed to happen, and other squadrons do "x", but our squadron does "y", then asking for clarification seems in order.

The problem with "should" is that's its an ideal, which sometimes is sacrificed for the ability to actually do the mission.  For instance every senior member of the unit "should" have a job, and every member's job should be something they desire to do.  This does not always happen.  If your squadron is completing the mission, the cadets are safe, promoting motivated and interested; the seniors are contributing and no regulations are being violated go forth and do great things
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Майор Хаткевич
200,000th Post Author
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,075
Unit: GLR-IL-049

« Reply #21 on: September 14, 2017, 11:50:21 AM »



Parents should always be involved and interested in what their cadets are doing, and ask all the questions they need to, but
the idea of a "Parental Advisory Council" is going to send a chill up the spine of anyone who reads it with experience in the program.

Not, again, with any intent on excluding parents, but there is so much to understanding the program, competing priorities for time, and
just general stress on staff who are all volunteers, that having less-informed people "advising" is just a bad idea.  For those who want to
be that involved, they should write a check, go to TLC, and roll up their sleeves.

Just to be clear, the parent council thing isn't my idea, it's already been on the radar apparently.  Even if it were ever adopted, I would see it only as a means to supplement and be a resource to the program, not run over it to make sure little Timmy is the star cadet. 

I've been a manager for more years than I care to remember, so I'm a big believer in consistency.  My interest is in knowing what "should" happen, as much as possible, so everyone gets the most from the program.  If "x" is supposed to happen, and other squadrons do "x", but our squadron does "y", then asking for clarification seems in order.


When it comes to the "outline" of the program, there are quite a few people here who can help.


As a former Deputy Commander for Cadets and now Squadron Commander, I loved parental feedback and questions. But I also expressed my position that I am their contact point, not the Cadet Commander. It eliminates incorrect information, and risks associated with a cadet interacting with adults one on one. I always tell parents that CAP has a robust cadet protection policy, limiting certain interactions between adults and cadets, but at the same time, we have no secrets, and parents are welcome (within reason) to observe our activities and ask any and all questions, at any time.
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rbi90vmi
Newbie

Posts: 4
Unit: MER-VA-094

« Reply #22 on: September 15, 2017, 03:02:44 PM »

Hey, all, first time poster…  Our son (13 yr old) joined CAP in June.  He has a desire for a career in the Air Force (either through the Academy or ROTC in college), and we thought this would be a great introduction/training/learning experience for him.  As we have been attending meetings, though, I’m seeing some that raise concerns.  I want to make sure he gets all he can out of the program (he’s highly motivated) so I just want to look to clarify a few things with more experienced folks.

My first question has to do with the PT test.  That’s the last thing he needs to get his Curry.  We’ve been trying to get it done for the last 2 months, but there’s always a reason that it doesn’t happen.  Anyway, the Cadet Commander said the other day that he wants them to test in their ABU’s, because if they were on a SAR mission they’d be running them.  When I was in the Army, we never tested, or did PT really, in BDU’s.  So I looked at the manual for the PT program and it says:  “Cadets do not have to exercise in a CAP uniform. Still, commanders should not require cadets to purchase special gear simply to participate in the program.”  So can the squadron go outside of what the manual indicates?  Or am I mis-reading the manual’s meaning?

I appreciate any information or guidance.  There are other questions, but this is the most pressing.
Just wanted to add that ES is NOT part of the Cadet Program, so using SAR as a reason for testing in ABU/BDU's is just wrong.

Sent from my LGLS992 using Tapatalk

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Max
Recruit

Posts: 6

« Reply #23 on: September 18, 2017, 01:26:37 PM »

Hey, all, first time poster…  Our son (13 yr old) joined CAP in June.  He has a desire for a career in the Air Force (either through the Academy or ROTC in college), and we thought this would be a great introduction/training/learning experience for him.  As we have been attending meetings, though, I’m seeing some that raise concerns.  I want to make sure he gets all he can out of the program (he’s highly motivated) so I just want to look to clarify a few things with more experienced folks.

My first question has to do with the PT test.  That’s the last thing he needs to get his Curry.  We’ve been trying to get it done for the last 2 months, but there’s always a reason that it doesn’t happen.  Anyway, the Cadet Commander said the other day that he wants them to test in their ABU’s, because if they were on a SAR mission they’d be running them.  When I was in the Army, we never tested, or did PT really, in BDU’s.  So I looked at the manual for the PT program and it says:  “Cadets do not have to exercise in a CAP uniform. Still, commanders should not require cadets to purchase special gear simply to participate in the program.”  So can the squadron go outside of what the manual indicates?  Or am I mis-reading the manual’s meaning?

I appreciate any information or guidance.  There are other questions, but this is the most pressing.
Just wanted to add that ES is NOT part of the Cadet Program, so using SAR as a reason for testing in ABU/BDU's is just wrong.

Sent from my LGLS992 using Tapatalk

Agreed.  My squadron takes one meeting per month to do PT and PT testing.  These meetings always have a UOD of PT attire (Shorts, T-Shirt, Sneakers).  What UOD is mandated on PT night may vary from squadron to squadron, however ES is not a part of the cadet program and should not be a factor in what Cadets wear while doing PT.  The only time I have ever done PT in ABUs/BDUs was at an encampment, and the PT was often crammed into our busy schedule after formations, with no time to change into PT attire.

Your son's situation is most likely a Cadet leadership issue.  I believe, like the others here, that your son's best course of action is passing his concerns up the chain of command, and if this yields nothing, arranging a discussion the Deputy Commander for Cadets.  I wish your son the best of luck in the program!  It has been fantastic for me so far.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2017, 01:30:08 PM by Max » Logged
Panzerbjorn
Seasoned Member

Posts: 279
Unit: MER-NC-048

« Reply #24 on: September 20, 2017, 08:28:18 AM »

I won't argue with the oversight comment, that kind of heads down the path of other concerns.  Also, spot on that it stem from the cadet commander himself.  His whole goal for being in CAP is to end up working for FEMA when he is done with school.  Everything he does he approaches from a SAR perspective.  It's working for him I guess, as he just got named to some FEMA youth program, I don't know of any other cadet that has an interest in it.

Thanks, all, for the insights.

This cadet is in for an eye-opener when he discovers FEMA is a checkbook, not a SAR organization.  This comes from working for FEMA full time for 8 years.
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Major
Command Pilot
Ground Branch Director
Eagle Scout
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CAP Talk  |  Cadet Programs  |  Cadet Programs Management & Activities  |  Topic: New CAP Parent... Questions, Questions, Questions
 


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