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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Tools of the trade  |  Topic: Consider Tampons for your 24 hour pack.
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Author Topic: Consider Tampons for your 24 hour pack.  (Read 4826 times)
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award
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Posts: 27,981

« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2016, 08:17:56 PM »

Just press releases and AARs if they are completed / distributed.

My wing has had two distress finds with fatalities this year, neither, to my understanding
involved anything but recovery.

I don't recall any in my AOR where aid was rendered for anything but minor injuries.

As mentioned above, with GA crashes it's usually either "walked away" or a fatality.
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"Effort" does not equal "results".
The contents of this post are Copyright 2017 by eclipse. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

MSG Mac
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,784
Unit: MER-MD-071

« Reply #21 on: July 20, 2016, 08:34:07 PM »

One of the drivers of our squadron van has " feminine Hygeine products" in case one of our female members needs them.
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Michael P. McEleney
Lt Col CAP
MSG USA (Retired)
68w20
Forum Regular

Posts: 163

« Reply #22 on: July 20, 2016, 09:13:09 PM »

I really hate to pile on, but I cannot discourage this strongly enough.  While I typically don't appeal to authority, I'm an Army Medic with nearly 10 years ARNG side and a deployment to Afghanistan.  I've recertified as a 68W 3 times, attended BCT3, taken part in live tissue labs, a Combat Medic Mentorship Course, and conducted thousands of hours of OJT and real-world work as a Healthcare/Trauma Specialist on the military side.

Do not pack tampons to provide bleeding control for penetrating trauma of any kind.  That's not what they're designed for.  They're designed with a very specific purpose, and an untrained person could cause significant harm if trying to employ them in the manner suggested by the OP.  The Army standard (for non 68Ws, per the AWT Guide) is to pack Kerlix (or Combat Gauze/other hemostatic gauze if available) into the wound in order to control bleeding.  The 68W standard is to pack Kerlix (or Combat Gauze/other hemostatic gauze if available).  The Marine Corps standard is to pack the wound with Kerlix (or Combat Gauze/other hemostatic gauze if available).  The Navy standard is the same.  The Air Force standard is the same.  These are the organizations that deal with this type of injury on a regular basis.  They are, arguably, the source for standards and best practices regarding penetrating trauma.

The bottom line is this: What were you trained to do?  What are you, as a CAP member, allowed to do?  If your response to those questions does not include "packing wounds with tampons," then you're wrong if you're packing them in your 24 hour gear with any purpose other than addressing menstrual bleeding.
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DakRadz
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,351

« Reply #23 on: July 21, 2016, 08:42:48 AM »

No.



I hope the image works- but take a look at two common combat bandages and then the tampon.

They do not expand that much.

For every expert that recommends them (and I've had buddies say the same to me) I can find plenty more who have taken a tampon apart or otherwise done actual research into why it is a bad idea.

See the above post- gauze is much more effective. Let's stick with built for purpose here. It's a nice idea, but not a great one. Gauze rolls and pads also have many uses, if you aren't afraid to use it on regular cadet needs instead of "Only The Big One." Plenty of scrapes shins, even can fashion a triangle bandage if you pick good multi-purpose supplies.

-Paramedic, etc..

Sent from my SM-N910T using Tapatalk

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JC004
[Insert Cool Title Here]
Global Moderator

Posts: 4,515

« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2016, 06:15:13 PM »

I added a travel pack (3) of them to the team first aid kit, simply because my philosophy for a team first aid kit is broader than Band-Aids -- it includes items for safety and comfort, like sunscreen, insect spray, etc.  I've added a mesh bag with most of the OTC medications listed on the national release form.  Unexpected situations do happen with missions and such, and sometimes a member forgets something they might need, which may not be easily acquired at 3am...  The additional reason is because they are absorbent.  Miserable members are ineffective, so some Pepto-Bismol tablets can be a lifesaver. 
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Shawn W.
Member

Posts: 75

« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2016, 07:22:46 PM »

I carry them in my gear, but for a very different reason. Compact emergency fire starting material. :-)
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stitchmom
Member

Posts: 65
Unit: not sure

« Reply #26 on: July 28, 2016, 05:36:30 PM »

Not a CAP member but I would be hesitant giving them to a cadet without specific parental permission due to the risk of TSS and perhaps religious beliefs.
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grunt82abn
Seasoned Member

Posts: 201

« Reply #27 on: July 29, 2016, 01:03:25 PM »

I really hate to pile on, but I cannot discourage this strongly enough.  While I typically don't appeal to authority, I'm an Army Medic with nearly 10 years ARNG side and a deployment to Afghanistan.  I've recertified as a 68W 3 times, attended BCT3, taken part in live tissue labs, a Combat Medic Mentorship Course, and conducted thousands of hours of OJT and real-world work as a Healthcare/Trauma Specialist on the military side.

Do not pack tampons to provide bleeding control for penetrating trauma of any kind.  That's not what they're designed for.  They're designed with a very specific purpose, and an untrained person could cause significant harm if trying to employ them in the manner suggested by the OP.  The Army standard (for non 68Ws, per the AWT Guide) is to pack Kerlix (or Combat Gauze/other hemostatic gauze if available) into the wound in order to control bleeding.  The 68W standard is to pack Kerlix (or Combat Gauze/other hemostatic gauze if available).  The Marine Corps standard is to pack the wound with Kerlix (or Combat Gauze/other hemostatic gauze if available).  The Navy standard is the same.  The Air Force standard is the same.  These are the organizations that deal with this type of injury on a regular basis.  They are, arguably, the source for standards and best practices regarding penetrating trauma.

The bottom line is this: What were you trained to do?  What are you, as a CAP member, allowed to do?  If your response to those questions does not include "packing wounds with tampons," then you're wrong if you're packing them in your 24 hour gear with any purpose other than addressing menstrual bleeding.

Excellent point!!! Spot on!!!
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Sean Riley, TSGT
US Army 1987 to 1994, WIARNG 1994 to 2008
DoD Firefighter Paramedic 2000 to Present
Live2Learn
Seasoned Member

Posts: 465

« Reply #28 on: July 29, 2016, 01:23:12 PM »

I carry them in my gear, but for a very different reason. Compact emergency fire starting material. :-)

Cotton dryer lint is far better tinder.  Cotton balls soaked n Vaseline and wrapped in aluminum foil work VERY well.  I don't think tampons in the 1st aid kit will light many fires except on this thread.
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Stonewall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 3,887

« Reply #29 on: August 04, 2016, 06:21:58 AM »

If you're stuck in a bathroom at Pulse Nightclub during an active shooter event and there's a tampon dispenser in the stall, then by all means, use one or 20 of those things to help control bleeding.  But if you're packing/stocking your IFAK, blowout kit, ground team medic kit, or vehicle first aid kit with tampons, then I really don't want you tending to my wounds because you really don't get it.

There are so many better and more appropriate tools that are made to control bleeding from trauma, that if you don't get it, you won't get it, and you're just trying to "wow" people with your wanna-be ditch medicine knowledge.

Stick with the tools that are designed and available for casualty care, not what could be used in an extremis situation.
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Al Sayre
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Posts: 2,512
Unit: SER-MS-001

Mississippi Wing
« Reply #30 on: August 04, 2016, 07:05:23 AM »

I carry them in my gear, but for a very different reason. Compact emergency fire starting material. :-)

Lit a whole box of them when I was a kid, and not one exploded as expected... >:D
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Lt Col Al Sayre
MS Wing Staff Dude
Admiral, Great Navy of the State of Nebraska
GRW #2787
Thonawit
Recruit

Posts: 45

« Reply #31 on: August 04, 2016, 10:19:04 AM »

I say go ahead and put one in your IFAK(great for nose bleeds). I see alot of untrained and unqualified people in CAP carrying around med equipment  they should not have. People in CAP need to stop playing EMS.

When we went through CERT training, during the First Aid portion our instructor advised to include a couple of tampons in the first aid kit mostly for nose bleeds and for their intended use. Our instructor is very active in the SAR community as a medic, is EMT qualified and works at the local ER.
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Regularly contradicts, contradicted CAP Regulations...
Spam
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Posts: 944
Unit: GA-001

« Reply #32 on: August 04, 2016, 10:34:51 AM »

There is no way as a team leader that I'm dispensing tampons to cadets on my team, lest I face irate parents.

I do usually stock pads, though for the intended use only, after I had an extremely embarrassed cadet come to me requesting something, anything, a couple of decades ago. One could make an argument that females need to stock them in their personal kit and not rely on Team gear. However, for whatever natural reason (strain of new circumstances on an FTX, in the case I had?) you cannot tell when the situation might arise the first time without warning. In those cases, I judge it to be an emergency.

V/R
Spam

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whatevah
Administrator

Posts: 1,013

my personal website, yo!
« Reply #33 on: August 04, 2016, 11:54:24 PM »

For the suggested purpose, QuikClot "combat gauze" is a better choice.  Can help clot off the bleeds and will be easily identified on an x-ray.   The only reason I can think of why tampons could be suggested would be the cost vs the correct stuff.  People can easily justify an inferior product when the cost is 90% cheaper than the correct product.  I'm an EMT and don't carry tampons in my personal trauma kit, I carry a few different types of QuikClot gauze ("combat" and EMS versions).
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Jerry Horn
CAPTalk Co-Admin
Stonewall
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Posts: 3,887

« Reply #34 on: August 05, 2016, 06:11:22 AM »

I texted two former CAP cadets last night regarding this subject and asked what THEY would put I'm a individual first aid kit (IFAK) or "blowout kit."

One is a highly decorated PJ (Distinnguished Flying Cross w/Valor) and the other is a Special Forces officer, between the 2 of them they have 8 combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan and have dealt with new gunshot wounds, among other trauma injuries than anyone on CAP Talk, short of a doc or career paramedic from a city like Chicago.

Regarding the homemade blowout kit I asked them this:

If you were making a a personal blowout kit that fit into a Ziploc (cargo pocket) sized bag, what needs to be in it? 

NOTE: Neither mentioned tampons!

SF officer response: 

I'll take a stab at it:
-Tourniquet or two
-Big, loose Guaze roll or an Israeli bandage or two to pack bullet wounds
- 14-gauge needle for needle decompression
-pack of quick clot, if you're good at packing wounds with it (I'm not)
-ace bandage, if you don't have an Israeli bandage.

I think if you're narrowing the mechanism of injury to gunshot wounds, you wouldn't need a nasal pharyngeal or a trachea kit. Obviously, blood pressure will be a concern, but with that size of a bag,an IV or IO kit won't fit.

Tom [the PJ] how did I do?

---------

PJ's response:

Sorry guys, had a zero dark thirty show and was asleep. The standard on battle pack, designed for the Ziploc bags and cargo pocket:
1x roll of kerlex gauze
1x ace type bandage
1x chest seal (Asherman or whatever the current flavor of the month is)
1x quick clot or similar
1x chest dart needle (14ga IV Cath)
1x CAT tourniquet or similar
1x nasal airway and lube
1x cravat
1x small Israeli bandage

Colin [the SF guy] was pretty spot on, just underestimated what fits in a Ziploc bag
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THRAWN
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,809

« Reply #35 on: August 05, 2016, 07:51:57 AM »

Mother of pearl, this is still a conversation? BLUF: use the right tool for the right job.
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Strup
"Belligerent....at times...."
AFRCC SMC 10-97
NSS ISC 05-00
USAF SOS 2000
USAF ACSC 2011
US NWC 2016
Jester
Seasoned Member

Posts: 223

« Reply #36 on: September 25, 2016, 09:12:41 PM »

https://www.personaldefensenetwork.com/article/severe-bleeding-first-aid-misconceptions-tampons/
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CAPAPRN
Member

Posts: 60
Unit: NER-CT-004

« Reply #37 on: September 26, 2016, 07:34:10 PM »

The one big use of tampax is they are really great for nose bleeds (they need to be trimmed) but you get the string hanging down for easy removal. In fact "nasal tampax" that we carry at the hospital looks just like regular tampax, just a little smaller. The one time I find a need for them is winter encampment, as the dry air causes nose bleeds quite frequently. Never had much of use for them otherwise, except for well, the obvious use - I do find female cadets forget to pack things, and do carry a supply to cadet events. Never thought of taking them to the range when I practice- in fact, I still think I'll keep them out of my range bag :)
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Capt. Carol A Whelan CAP CTWG,
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DakRadz
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,351

« Reply #38 on: September 26, 2016, 07:52:26 PM »



Never had much of use for them otherwise, except for well, the obvious use - I do find female cadets forget to pack things, and do carry a supply to cadet events.

This has been addressed earlier, but the difference between a pad and a tampon being provided to a female cadet can be significant, especially since Toxic Shock Syndrome is no small issue (especially given the stress and potential field environments at CAP events).

If you don't know what Toxic Shock Syndrome is, you should look it up. And then take the tampons out of gear...

1st Lt Raduenz

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SARDOC
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,430

« Reply #39 on: December 23, 2016, 02:34:33 AM »



Never had much of use for them otherwise, except for well, the obvious use - I do find female cadets forget to pack things, and do carry a supply to cadet events.

This has been addressed earlier, but the difference between a pad and a tampon being provided to a female cadet can be significant, especially since Toxic Shock Syndrome is no small issue (especially given the stress and potential field environments at CAP events).

If you don't know what Toxic Shock Syndrome is, you should look it up. And then take the tampons out of gear...

1st Lt Raduenz

Can't agree with this statement anymore.  Toxic Shock is a very real possibility because most Tampons are chemically treated for different reasons.   Ultimately, the chemicals you are introducing into spaces that they were not intended.
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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Tools of the trade  |  Topic: Consider Tampons for your 24 hour pack.
 


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