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Eclipse
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« on: January 10, 2018, 03:27:35 PM »

http://www.maxwell.af.mil/News/Display/Article/1411431/afjrotc-launches-flight-academy-program-to-address-aircrew-shortage/

"MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. --
Headquarters Air Force Junior ROTC here has launched a pilot program aimed at potentially putting more pilots in the cockpits of military aircraft to help address the Air Force’s ongoing aircrew shortage.

Beginning in the summer of 2018, select AFJROTC cadets who applied for a new Fight Academy scholarship will attend an accredited aviation program at one of six partnering universities to get a private pilot license.

The competitive application process started in fall 2017. The names of the initial 120 scholarship recipients from the more than 800 who applied will be released in early 2018.

“The number of applicants and the demographics of the applicant pool have turned out to be beyond any we could have hoped for. It is exciting to know we can concurrently answer the number and demographic issues of the aircrew crisis,” said Todd Taylor, AFJROTC Region 1 director and acting director for the Flight Academy Program.

AFJROTC’s Flight Academy supports the Air Force Aircrew Crisis Task Force. The task force was tasked by the Air Force chief of staff to come up with new and innovative ways to address the service’s shortage of experienced aircrews. The ACTF is tackling the problem along seven lines of effort: requirements, accessions, production, absorption, retention, sortie production and industry collaboration.

The AFJROTC Flight Academy scholarship program is an initiative born of a joint military-industry working group within the industry collaboration line of effort that is responsible for “increasing intake.” The working group is charged with leveraging Civil Air Patrol, AFJROTC and general civil aviation to bring back the “luster of aviation” to high school students and to increase diversity in aviation fields.

“The Flight Academy initiative accomplishes two important tasks simultaneously: it helps ‘get the word out’ regarding the opportunities in the aviation community and it addresses the issue of diversity throughout the aviation community,” said Scotty Lewis, deputy director of AFJROTC and the military lead for the Increasing Intake Working Group.

Of AFJROTC’s approximately 120,000 cadets, 58 percent are minority and 40 percent are female. Flight Academy scholarship applications mirror the demographic: 55 percent of those applying for the 2018 scholarships are female or minority cadets.

AFJROTC leaders plan on collaborating with civilian aviation organizations, industry and others to provide partial funding for future Flight Academy scholarships. The scholarships pay for transportation, room and board, academics and flight hours required to potentially earn a private pilot license. The in-residence training typically lasts about seven to nine weeks.

The 120 AFJROTC cadets selected for the summer’s Flight Academy and the 250 planned for 2019 are but a drop in the large commercial and military pilot shortage bucket. Civilian airline industry experts project a demand for 117,000 new commercial pilots over the next 20 years. The Air Force is currently short of at least 1,500 pilots to fulfill its requirements.   

To help fill those voids down the road, AFJROTC leaders’ end goal is to offer scholarships to 1 percent of its cadet corps, or 1,200 cadets, a year.

Leaders up and down the military chain are aware that many of the cadets who do earn their private pilot license through Flight Academy probably won’t have a career in military aviation in their sights, opting for the civilian airline industry instead. The cadets will not incur a military commitment after getting their private pilot license through Flight Academy, nor does getting the license guarantee acceptance into one of the Air Force’s officer accessioning programs.

“We understand not all of the cadets graduating from the Flight Academy will elect to take a military track, but that’s okay as those young people electing to enter commercial aviation will have a positive impact on the overall national crisis,” said Brig. Gen. Michael Koscheski, director of the Air Force Aircrew Crisis Task Force."
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etodd
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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2018, 05:42:43 PM »

Will AFJROTC have a 'one up' on recruiting high schoolers interested in being a pilot?

Yes, CAP offers some scholarship help, but is it close to matching this number and is it full pay PPL?
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abdsp51
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2018, 06:03:44 PM »

Band Aid fix to a surgical problem.
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Eclipse
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2018, 06:09:13 PM »

Will AFJROTC have a 'one up' on recruiting high schoolers interested in being a pilot?

They already do, if for no other reason then they are "there" and CAP generally "isn't".

Two different organizations with very different missions and goals, but I thought it was somewhat
amusing that the article says CAP will be "leveraged". 

I've felt "leveraged" by CAP a few times in my career, but never in this context.  Absent offering similar
free flight training scholarships (which would be a great, expensive way to fill the ranks) I don't know how
the USAF is going to "leverage" CAP cadets to making flying exciting again.

I'm open to ideas.
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etodd
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2018, 08:07:23 PM »


... I don't know how the USAF is going to "leverage" CAP cadets to making flying exciting again.


By publicizing the AFJROTC programs benefits in CAP communications to make sure our 13 and 14 year old Cadets know about it and can switch to AFJROTC when they hit high school. Hoping to then entice them into ROTC in college.
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abdsp51
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2018, 10:50:37 PM »


... I don't know how the USAF is going to "leverage" CAP cadets to making flying exciting again.


By publicizing the AFJROTC programs benefits in CAP communications to make sure our 13 and 14 year old Cadets know about it and can switch to AFJROTC when they hit high school. Hoping to then entice them into ROTC in college.

Or they go the dual enrolled route.
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Airplane girl
Member

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« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2018, 09:26:16 AM »


... I don't know how the USAF is going to "leverage" CAP cadets to making flying exciting again.


By publicizing the AFJROTC programs benefits in CAP communications to make sure our 13 and 14 year old Cadets know about it and can switch to AFJROTC when they hit high school. Hoping to then entice them into ROTC in college.

Or they go the dual enrolled route.

But what about cadets who live in an area with no JROTC? I know I wanted to join JROTC as well as CAP, but neither of the two schools I have been to have JROTC.
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etodd
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« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2018, 11:32:10 AM »


... I don't know how the USAF is going to "leverage" CAP cadets to making flying exciting again.


By publicizing the AFJROTC programs benefits in CAP communications to make sure our 13 and 14 year old Cadets know about it and can switch to AFJROTC when they hit high school. Hoping to then entice them into ROTC in college.

Or they go the dual enrolled route.

But what about cadets who live in an area with no JROTC? I know I wanted to join JROTC as well as CAP, but neither of the two schools I have been to have JROTC.

Yes, only about 890 schools.  Here is a nice map of them:

http://www.airuniversity.af.mil/Holm-Center/AFJROTC/Display/Article/950637/
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FW
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« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2018, 12:03:51 PM »

1200 Scholarships/year is a good start.  If we were allowed to pay our CFI pilots, CAP would be able to "leverage" AFJROTC.... ::)
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etodd
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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2018, 05:25:40 PM »

1200 Scholarships/year is a good start.

Is that 1200 or 120?
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FW
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« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2018, 07:23:45 PM »

1200 Scholarships/year is a good start.

Is that 1200 or 120?


"To help fill those voids down the road, AFJROTC leaders’ end goal is to offer scholarships to 1 percent of its cadet corps, or 1,200 cadets, a year."
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etodd
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« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2018, 08:11:31 PM »

1200 Scholarships/year is a good start.

Is that 1200 or 120?


"To help fill those voids down the road, AFJROTC leaders’ end goal is to offer scholarships to 1 percent of its cadet corps, or 1,200 cadets, a year."


Ah, gotcha. 120 now and then increase every year until 1200. :)
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PHall
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« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2018, 11:33:39 PM »

One of the hardest things to get and to keep in AFROTC is a Pilot Slot. And as soon as they find out that going to pilot training incurs a 10 year service commitment, a fair number lose interest.
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etodd
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« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2018, 01:44:06 AM »

One of the hardest things to get and to keep in AFROTC is a Pilot Slot. And as soon as they find out that going to pilot training incurs a 10 year service commitment, a fair number lose interest.

What if they 'wash out' of pilot school. Are they still committed to the full 10 years?
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etodd
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« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2018, 02:40:47 PM »

The article in the AF Magazine:

Quote
USAF Drops $2.4 Million in Scholarships To Get Cadets Private Pilot Licenses

Recipients of the newly launched AFJROTC Flight Academy scholarship will take classes this summer, each course lasting between seven and nine weeks, according to the Air Force. If all goes according to plan, cadets will return with private pilot licenses.

From zero to PPL in 7-9 weeks. Thats intense and you can bet they will only take the cream of the crop.

http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pages/2018/January%202018/USAF-Drops-24-Million-in-Scholarships-To-Get-Cadets-Private-Pilot-Licenses.aspx
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abdsp51
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« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2018, 03:58:52 PM »

Until your cream of the crop learns its more lucrative to fly outside and away from the military.  The reason why there is a shortage, aging air frames and low pay.

Sorry but in this day in age especially with the "me first" generation if they are going to fly they will fly where the money is good and uncle same doesn't cut it. 

Band aid fix to a surgical problem.  It's the same across all the career fields.
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PHall
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Posts: 6,266

« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2018, 09:14:19 PM »

One of the hardest things to get and to keep in AFROTC is a Pilot Slot. And as soon as they find out that going to pilot training incurs a 10 year service commitment, a fair number lose interest.

What if they 'wash out' of pilot school. Are they still committed to the full 10 years?

Nope. Depending on their new AFSC they might incur a service commitment in excess of the standard 8 years. Lots of variables here.
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Mitchell 1969
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« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2018, 01:24:21 AM »

The article in the AF Magazine:

Quote
USAF Drops $2.4 Million in Scholarships To Get Cadets Private Pilot Licenses

Recipients of the newly launched AFJROTC Flight Academy scholarship will take classes this summer, each course lasting between seven and nine weeks, according to the Air Force. If all goes according to plan, cadets will return with private pilot licenses.

From zero to PPL in 7-9 weeks. Thats intense and you can bet they will only take the cream of the crop.


In the 60’s and 70’s, CAP ran “Cadet Flying Encampments.” About 100 cadets let year, sometimes broken into classes of about 25 each. Originally they were four weeks, zero time to Private Pilot license. They morphed into a system where solo and a total of 15 hours was obtained at home, the remainder at Flying Encampment.

I went from zero time to license in less than six weeks and I was t alone. It was somewhat intense, but manageable. For example, we didn’t fly on weekends, but sometimes flew twice a day depending on phase.



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Bernard J. Wilson, Major, CAP

Mitchell 1969; Earhart 1971; Eaker 1973. Cadet Flying Encampment, License, 1970. IACE New Zealand 1971; IACE Korea 1973.

CAP has been bery, bery good to me.
Live2Learn
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« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2018, 12:42:23 PM »

Aircrew "shortages" may be temporary.   https://generalaviationnews.com/2018/01/15/development-of-autonomous-air-tanker-begins/#comment-1019372  Air tanker tactics and operational environments have many similarities to military missions. 
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chacharoo
Recruit

Posts: 22

« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2018, 05:51:20 PM »

Myself and about 5 other cadets from my AFJROTC unit applied for this scholarship. It was an extremely  competitive and comprehensive process.


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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Aviation & Flying Activities  |  Topic: AFJROTC launches Flight Academy program to address aircrew shortage
 


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