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Sierra_Ranger17
Newbie

Posts: 4

« on: January 06, 2018, 05:50:18 PM »

Hello,

I'm a TFO and my sister is a C/CMSgt. If she has friends over, how do I handle CPPT? She hangs out with squadron friends after meetings and I'm not sure whether I can go with. Since she can't drive I usually tag along but I don't want to get in trouble if this continues, especially because I'm male.

Also, she is making a Discord server for an upcoming squadron project. Can I be on it with 20+ other cadets or does it fall under closed media?

HELP!!
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 28,615

« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2018, 05:54:53 PM »

Hello,

I'm a TFO and my sister is a C/CMSgt. If she has friends over, how do I handle CPPT? She hangs out with squadron friends after meetings and I'm not sure whether I can go with. Since she can't drive I usually tag along but I don't want to get in trouble if this continues, especially because I'm male.

Your siste, obviously, is no issue, with other kids who are cadets, the 3-up rule applies, at a minimum, otherwise probably a non-issue, though you should be vigilent at all times of your behavior, and consider reducing your involvement with them and let them find other rides.

An 18+ year old male with under age females has 100003 pitfalls without CAP being in the mix. Consider that.

Also, she is making a Discord server for an upcoming squadron project. Can I be on it with 20+ other cadets or does it fall under closed media?

Best bet is to steer clear of that.
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NIN
VIP

Posts: 4,870
Unit: of issue

« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2018, 07:01:46 PM »

Hello,

I'm a TFO and my sister is a C/CMSgt. If she has friends over, how do I handle CPPT? She hangs out with squadron friends after meetings and I'm not sure whether I can go with. Since she can't drive I usually tag along but I don't want to get in trouble if this continues, especially because I'm male.

Also, she is making a Discord server for an upcoming squadron project. Can I be on it with 20+ other cadets or does it fall under closed media?

HELP!!

TFO in my squadron is in the same boat. C/CMSgt sister rides to CAP with him. (I had to check to make sure you weren't my guy!)

He goes to the "after meeting meeting" at DQ with his sister, but sits at the far end of the table, with her between him and anybody else.

He's cordial and social with the cadets present, but not chummy.

There are enough people there, in a public place, that I'm *reasonably* sure no hanky-panky is going on.
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Darin Ninness, Lt Col, CAP
Sq Bubba, Wing Dude, National Guy
I like to have Difficult Adult Conversationsô
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2017 by NIN. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.
darkmatter
Forum Regular

Posts: 139

« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2018, 09:27:04 PM »

I personally don't like how the CPPT is worded for former, cadets current senior members. It's worded like all your friends you made when you were a cadet, your just suppose to cut all ties with them can't hang out with them no interaction. You can't make friend with someone then stop on a dime.
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EMT-83
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,862

« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2018, 09:29:30 PM »

There's a reason it's called crossing over to the dark side.
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Ned
Resident Philosopher

Posts: 2,184

« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2018, 02:06:33 AM »

I'm a TFO and my sister is a C/CMSgt. If she has friends over, how do I handle CPPT? She hangs out with squadron friends after meetings and I'm not sure whether I can go with. Since she can't drive I usually tag along but I don't want to get in trouble if this continues, especially because I'm male.

Let me see if I can help.

The  CPP normally limits substantial contact between cadets and senior members outside of official CAP activities, with some exceptions for relatives and professional relationships like teachers who happen to have cadets in their classes.  Based on your description here, there is certainly nothing wrong with going out after the meeting with your cadet sister for a snack and discussion about the meeting.  The other cadets (presumably your sister's friends) however are the problem. Unless another exception applies, it would be improper for you to socialize with them without another senior present.

The intent of these provisions is to minimize the chances of a cadet and senior developing an improper  "peer-to-peer" relationship in place the appropriate teacher/leader/mentor relationship our program requires.

Take a look at CAPR 52-10, paragraph 2-7(c) for a more complete explanation.

Quote

Also, she is making a Discord server for an upcoming squadron project. Can I be on it with 20+ other cadets or does it fall under closed media?

I am not particularly familiar with the Discord app, but looking quickly at their website, it appears to be a gamer-friendly text and voice messaging app that allows users to communicate freely and securely.  That rather sounds like it would fall into the prohibition against closed media because it appears that the messages cannot easily be monitored by third parties.  Accordingly, you may only use Discord to send "brief messages of an official nature" to a cadet. (CAPR 50-10, para 2-7(b).) Personally, I would avoid it altogether. 

Thank you for asking these thoughtful questions.  I hope this helps.

Ned Lee
Col, CAP
National Cadet Program Manager
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abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,547
Unit: Classified

« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2018, 09:08:20 AM »

I personally don't like how the CPPT is worded for former, cadets current senior members. It's worded like all your friends you made when you were a cadet, your just suppose to cut all ties with them can't hang out with them no interaction. You can't make friend with someone then stop on a dime.

You totally miss the point behind CPP then. 
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darkmatter
Forum Regular

Posts: 139

« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2018, 10:11:49 AM »

I personally don't like how the CPPT is worded for former, cadets current senior members. It's worded like all your friends you made when you were a cadet, your just suppose to cut all ties with them can't hang out with them no interaction. You can't make friend with someone then stop on a dime.

You totally miss the point behind CPP then.


Then explain why it's written as such.
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abdsp51
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Posts: 2,547
Unit: Classified

« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2018, 12:11:11 PM »

I personally don't like how the CPPT is worded for former, cadets current senior members. It's worded like all your friends you made when you were a cadet, your just suppose to cut all ties with them can't hang out with them no interaction. You can't make friend with someone then stop on a dime.

You totally miss the point behind CPP then.


Then explain why it's written as such.


I can't speak to why it's written as such.  But if you're having heart burn with this now good luck in the professional world. 

But again I see you miss the point behind CPP and totally misunderstand the verbiage in regards to former cadets turned senior members. 
You can interact with them at meetings and activities.  You can't interact with them one on one unless there is a another party or parties.  That is to protect not only the cadet but you as well.  I am going to take a stab and say your between 18-21 far to young to have to deal with the pains that any type of misconduct allegation can bring. 

There are plenty of policies similar to this in many organizations.  Ultimately you made the decision to become a senior member, if you wanted to hang out with cadets you should have stayed a cadet.

[edited to fix quote]
« Last Edit: January 07, 2018, 06:00:02 PM by SarDragon » Logged
Ned
Resident Philosopher

Posts: 2,184

« Reply #9 on: January 07, 2018, 02:55:22 PM »

Then explain why it's written as such.

Let me try.

All seniors are charged with protecting cadets, and seniors working in CP are all leaders, mentors, and coaches to our cadets.  A teaching / mentoring relationship is incompatible with a peer-to-peer friendship.  You can certainly be "friendly" with cadets, but not friends.  And we do that for important reasons.  First, it is "prejudicial to the good order and discipline " of our cadet program, because it undermines discipline and the necessary teacher-student relationship.  You don't get to chill on the weekends with your high school teachers, coaches, or college professors, chatting about your love lives, sports, or music.  Because there is a necessary separation between the two roles for the teacher to be effective.

Similarly, when an enlisted soldier or airman is commissioned through OCS/OTS, they do not normally return to the same unit because of the presumably strong friendships that soldier or airman formed with other enlisted folks before becoming an officer.  The military has specific rules that restrict "fraternization" between officers and enlisted specifically to preserve unit order and discipline.  Obviously CAP is not subject to the UCMJ, but the underlying rationale is the same.

Cadet/senior friendships almost always cause strife and Drama in the unit.  Did Cadet X get selected to be the next flight commander because X earned it, or because X is TFO Lee's best friend?  The perception of favoritism in a unit is almost as bad as actual favoritism.  Poor X might actually be passed over for command because TFO Lee is bending over backwards to appear fair.  But mostly the rest of the unit will not really know, and that leads to Drama.

Second, peer-to-peer relationships measurably increase the risk to cadet members.  And reducing actual risk to cadets is the whole point of the CPP.  Seniors responsible for supervising cadets have difficulty holding their friends to the same safety standards as non-friend cadets.  Whether that is tolerating horseplay on a flight line, or stopping inappropriate sexual comments or teasing at a weekly meeting.  Seniors who are "friends" with cadets are also at greater risk of allowing the friendship to grow into a romantic relationship, which is always prohibited in CAP.

I certainly understand about the value of friendships developed among cadets.  I am proud to say that some former fellow cadets of mine are still my good friends many decades later.  And I truly value those friendships.

There are ways to manage the transition from a "cadet with a lot of cadet friends" to a senior member in CAP.  Following the example of the military, the new senior could move to another unit.  If that won't work, you could either pause your CAP membership for a bit so you can retain your valued friends until they, too have crossed to the Dark Side.  For me, it turned out that relatively few of my buddies went on to become seniors.  (One joined the Navy, a couple went to college out of state, etc.)  I also started working with another cadet unit nearer my college.

There are undoubtedly other ways to manage the transition.  But the rules remain the rules, and  as a senior member you may not have a peer-to-peer relationship with a cadet.  Period.

I hope this helps.

Ned Lee
National Cadet Program Manager

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Alaric
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 781

« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2018, 03:02:48 PM »

I personally don't like how the CPPT is worded for former, cadets current senior members. It's worded like all your friends you made when you were a cadet, your just suppose to cut all ties with them can't hang out with them no interaction. You can't make friend with someone then stop on a dime.

You totally miss the point behind CPP then.


Then explain why it's written as such.

Because CAP is part of the Nanny State :)  I agree with many parts of CPPT but in many others the presumption seems to be that all adults are potential predators.
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Alaric
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Posts: 781

« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2018, 03:04:47 PM »

Then explain why it's written as such.

Let me try.

All seniors are charged with protecting cadets, and seniors working in CP are all leaders, mentors, and coaches to our cadets.  A teaching / mentoring relationship is incompatible with a peer-to-peer friendship.  You can certainly be "friendly" with cadets, but not friends.  And we do that for important reasons.  First, it is "prejudicial to the good order and discipline " of our cadet program, because it undermines discipline and the necessary teacher-student relationship.  You don't get to chill on the weekends with your high school teachers, coaches, or college professors, chatting about your love lives, sports, or music.  Because there is a necessary separation between the two roles for the teacher to be effective.


Ned Lee
National Cadet Program Manager

Funny I remember many social occasions with my professors in both undergraduate and graduate school, they must have had nefarious plans and all we students just sheep like victims.  Lucky I survived
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Sierra_Ranger17
Newbie

Posts: 4

« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2018, 03:37:14 PM »

Thank you all for the help!! Iíll keep your advice in mind in the future. Being a TFO is tough because itís easy to forget that Iím not on a level with cadets, even though weíre the same age. Professional separation is something Iím working on, and Iíll strive to do better as I gain experience.

Does anyone know of an instant messanger we could use that Iím allowed to be on? Email is cumbersome when planning rapidly changing details for this project. Thanks in advance.
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Ned
Resident Philosopher

Posts: 2,184

« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2018, 03:53:58 PM »

Although it appears that the OP has most of what he needs, I need to address this.


Funny I remember many social occasions with my professors in both undergraduate and graduate school, they must have had nefarious plans and all we students just sheep like victims.  Lucky I survived

The world is undoubtedly a better place because you are here, but let me clear up a misunderstanding. 

There is a world of difference between meeting at a social occasion and a peer-to-peer friendship. It is disingenuous to pretend otherwise.

Meeting a cadet at a social occasion is not necessarily improper.  CAP often arranges social occasions for our membership, attended by both cadets and seniors.  Various banquets, cadet balls, unit pizza nights, and other social affairs are not uncommon.  The regulation specifically permits inadvertent brief meetings at other kinds of social occasions, or mutual membership in outside organizations.

Like you, I met my undergraduate and grad school professors periodically at mixers.  I suspect they were trying to "humanize" the faculty.  Almost always awkward affairs with stifling polite conversation on safe subjects.  Then I went out with my friends.  There was never any confusion in my mind about whether I was friends with Professor Kingsfield.  I suspect your experience was similar.


And so the point remains.  Teachers should not and can not be both effective and a peer-to-peer friend with their students.  Friendly, yes.  But not friends.  I suspect there are some former teachers out there who had difficulty with this concept.  And this is the universal, mainstream rule.  And as I have done several times before, I invite you to point to any national youth serving organization that allows or encourages the leaders to befriend the students.  I can save you some time, it is not the Boy or Girl Scouts, JROTC, the Royal Rangers, or nationally-recognized faith communities.  Neither is it Little League, Boys and Girls Clubs, or Camp Fire.  Ditto for Young Marines and the YWCA.
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Alaric
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 781

« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2018, 04:23:18 PM »

Although it appears that the OP has most of what he needs, I need to address this.


Funny I remember many social occasions with my professors in both undergraduate and graduate school, they must have had nefarious plans and all we students just sheep like victims.  Lucky I survived

The world is undoubtedly a better place because you are here, but let me clear up a misunderstanding. 

There is a world of difference between meeting at a social occasion and a peer-to-peer friendship. It is disingenuous to pretend otherwise.

Meeting a cadet at a social occasion is not necessarily improper.  CAP often arranges social occasions for our membership, attended by both cadets and seniors.  Various banquets, cadet balls, unit pizza nights, and other social affairs are not uncommon.  The regulation specifically permits inadvertent brief meetings at other kinds of social occasions, or mutual membership in outside organizations.

Like you, I met my undergraduate and grad school professors periodically at mixers.  I suspect they were trying to "humanize" the faculty.  Almost always awkward affairs with stifling polite conversation on safe subjects.  Then I went out with my friends.  There was never any confusion in my mind about whether I was friends with Professor Kingsfield.  I suspect your experience was similar.



You would be incorrect, in addition to the type of mixers you are  discussing I often participated in small group interactions and even one on one with faculty where mathematical and economic theories were discussed and food and drink consumed. I played chess on a regular basis with one of my professors, participated in trivia contests with another. I remain friends with those people even today.  Once again for those of us who do not need big brother looking after us, we manage
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 28,615

« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2018, 05:02:05 PM »

Once again for those of us who do not need big brother looking after us, we manage
And for those who hid bad behavior from Big Brother, the regs exist.

Sadly there are people in this world who need protection.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2018, 05:32:35 PM by Eclipse » Logged


kwe1009
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 915

« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2018, 05:41:24 PM »

Once again for those of us who do not need big brother looking after us, we manage
And for those who hid bad behavior from Big Brother, the regs exist.

Sadly there are people in this world who need protection.

And don't forget that protect is for everyone.  The cadet is protected from predators and Senior Member has protection from false accusation and/or unwanted advances. 
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TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,192

« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2018, 12:58:54 PM »

I can't really decipher if I missed this or not above---

All of the rhetoric regarding the dating stuff above is moot to the question asked. CAP's policy states that there is a distinction between individuals who knew each other before CAP and those who met in CAP. Regarding meeting someone in CAP, your private life is your private life, so long as your relationship is not what could be considered inappropriate. There are numerous instances where someone can develop into being a personal mentor, granted there is no overstep in their relationship in CAP and with legal guardians (e.g., a senior member who tutors someone, helps them through substance abuse, etc.). That's a personal matter outside of CAP.

If you travel with a cadet, that's between you and that cadet's parents. There are ways to "CYA" on having someone else's kid in your car. But that's getting too detailed for what this topic is. As for your sister inviting friends over, there's nothing wrong with you sitting in the living when they're all hanging around in the living room. It's just a matter of how far you take that relationship. If there is any suggestion that it's becoming intimate between you and one of those cadets, it's a problem in CAP (regardless of what the law may say). If you're driving your sister and her friend to prom, that's not a big deal. If you drive them to the mall, not a big deal. If you drive them to the mall and shop with them, not a big deal. If you're driving your sister's friend without your sister there, okay, now I'm going to start questioning what's going on here. It may be perfectly legal; fair enough; but CAP says no.

You can be friends with cadets as a senior member. Friends is a loose term. But you need to watch that relationship and make sure it doesn't go too far.

I appreciate the question though, and it's a good one. I'd much rather have someone trying to figure out what they should be doing than to think "Oh, it's fine either way." I think you're okay with your situation. Just be aware of it.
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 28,615

« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2018, 01:22:18 PM »

CAP's policy states that there is a distinction between individuals who knew each other before CAP and those who met in CAP.

No, it doesn't.

Regarding meeting someone in CAP, your private life is your private life, so long as your relationship is not what could be considered inappropriate.

No, it's not, at least in regards to adult and cadet interaction.

There are numerous instances where someone can develop into being a personal mentor, granted there is no overstep in their relationship in CAP and with legal guardians (e.g., a senior member who tutors someone, helps them through substance abuse, etc.). That's a personal matter outside of CAP.

No, it's not.

If you travel with a cadet, that's between you and that cadet's parents.

No, it isn't.

There are ways to "CYA" on having someone else's kid in your car. But that's getting too detailed for what this topic is. As for your sister inviting friends over, there's nothing wrong with you sitting in the living when they're all hanging around in the living room. It's just a matter of how far you take that relationship. If there is any suggestion that it's becoming intimate between you and one of those cadets, it's a problem in CAP (regardless of what the law may say).

Spending time with cadets outside of CAP could well be considered a boundary violation as a minimum,
and is not a good idea.

Yes.  When you turn 18, you have decisions to make, at least in a CAP context.

You can be friends with cadets as a senior member. Friends is a loose term. But you need to watch that relationship and make sure it doesn't go too far.
No, you really can't. It's a conflict of interest from both perspectives, and for every anecdotal "but I knew this one..."
there's 10 examples that go sideways, either in spectacular, media-related ways, or more generally, subtle, less
obvious ones.

Time for you to review the Cadet Protection regulations.
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foo
Forum Regular

Posts: 162

« Reply #19 on: January 08, 2018, 01:41:27 PM »

CAP's policy states that there is a distinction between individuals who knew each other before CAP and those who met in CAP.

No, it doesn't.


Yes, it actually does. See "prior relationships."

On the rest I concur, especially your conclusion.
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 28,615

« Reply #20 on: January 08, 2018, 02:40:11 PM »

CAP's policy states that there is a distinction between individuals who knew each other before CAP and those who met in CAP.

No, it doesn't.


Yes, it actually does. See "prior relationships."

Doesn't likely apply in this case, see below, (and I would argue that regardless it's a dangerous place to be).

CAPR 52-10, Page 9
https://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/R052_010_C5B73B2B78712.pdf

c. Personal Contact Outside of CAP Activities. Normally, cadets and adult leaders are not permitted
to have significant contact outside of official CAP activities. However, CAP recognizes that there
are a limited number of situations in which contact between adult leaders and cadets outside of authorized
meetings and activities may occur because of chance encounters, pre-existing relationships, or other
situations described below.

(1) Chance Encounters. Brief conversations between adult leaders and cadets resulting from
chance encounters in the community are permitted.

(2) Prior Relationships. Non-romantic relationships between adult leaders and cadets that existed
prior to one of the individuals joining CAP
(e.g. family, neighbors, coworkers, etc.) are not improper
and may continue, including substantial contact outside of CAP activities. However, all CPP standards
of practice will continue to apply during CAP activities except the ďtransportation rule of threeĒ (2-3g) is
not applicable. Adult leaders with prior relationships with cadets may transport those cadets to and from
CAP activities under one-deep leadership with the parentís permission.


One could presume these are members of the same unit as Sierra_Ranger17, in which case those
relationships didn't likely exist prior to his joining CAP, considering the ages involved,
it's likely quite the opposite.

These are some of the most potentially dangerous situations, because people will look
for and maybe find loopholes to maintain a behavior which is potentially hazardous to
the cadets involved, and if something goes sideways, later everyone will ask "how could this have happened"?

The best course to to disengage and consider the totality of the situation instead of looking for loopholes.
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foo
Forum Regular

Posts: 162

« Reply #21 on: January 08, 2018, 02:50:13 PM »

Agreed. My challenge was only to your factual error.

As a parent (not to mention a conscientious officer), I find rather disturbing the lax attitudes concerning the CPP expressed here by some CP officers.
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Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 28,615

« Reply #22 on: January 08, 2018, 03:00:12 PM »

I see similar issues the Boys Scouts "i.e. rulz is rulez, but we're all friends, amirite...?"

At least in this case the young man is asking the question, which means odds he's given it
more then a passing thought.
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Sierra_Ranger17
Newbie

Posts: 4

« Reply #23 on: January 08, 2018, 03:20:44 PM »

Just some clarifications: I only drive my sister, since she's 15 and doesn't have a license. Other cadets drive themselves/ride with friends and we all meet up at the Chickfila by our unit. I do not drive other cadets.

My sister and her best friend are the only people I have a preexisting relationship with. The cadets I see after meetings are people I met through CAP. I joined as a senior so I'm not a former cadet with old friendships.

EDIT: Sometimes other seniors come to the post meeting meeting, and if they do I sit with them. However sometimes Iím the only senior so I do what I can to be social but professional. Let me know if you want further clarifications.

Thanks everyone for your help. Let's keep it civil and continue the discussion!
« Last Edit: January 08, 2018, 03:31:24 PM by Sierra_Ranger17 » Logged
foo
Forum Regular

Posts: 162

« Reply #24 on: January 08, 2018, 03:48:42 PM »

At least in this case the young man is asking the question, which means odds he's given it
more then a passing thought.

Yes indeed, kudos for seeking clarification on a vitally important subject.

... continue the discussion!

But why? Haven't your questions been answered?
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Sierra_Ranger17
Newbie

Posts: 4

« Reply #25 on: January 08, 2018, 05:37:16 PM »

... continue the discussion!

But why? Haven't your questions been answered?

Yes, and I'm enjoying seeing others' insight.
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TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,192

« Reply #26 on: January 09, 2018, 11:51:10 AM »

Eclipse, we're usually on the same page in most of these discussions, but I'm going to need to defend myself on this one here; some of these may already have been answered.

CAP's policy states that there is a distinction between individuals who knew each other before CAP and those who met in CAP.

No, it doesn't.

Prior Relationships. Non-romantic relationships between adult leaders and cadets that existed
prior to one of the individuals joining CAP (e.g. family, neighbors, coworkers, etc.) are not improper
and may continue, including substantial contact outside of CAP activities. However, all CPP standards
of practice will continue to apply during CAP activities except the ďtransportation rule of threeĒ (2-3g) is
not applicable. Adult leaders with prior relationships with cadets may transport those cadets to and from
CAP activities under one-deep leadership with the parentís permission.


Yes, it does quite literally make that distinction.



Quote
Regarding meeting someone in CAP, your private life is your private life, so long as your relationship is not what could be considered inappropriate.

No, it's not, at least in regards to adult and cadet interaction.

(3) Professional Relationships. Relationships of a professional nature between adult leaders and
cadets (e.g. teacher/student, doctor/patient, clergy/congregant, etc.) are not improper, and substantial
contact outside of CAP activities may occur, provided the interactions are made in the context of the
professional relationship.

(4) Other Organizations. An adult leaderís and cadetís mutual membership in another organization
is not improper, and substantial contact outside of CAP activities may occur when the interactions
are made expressly for the purpose of participating in that organizationís activities (e.g. a cadet and
senior join a Ham radio club and interact at radio club events, IAW club rules).

5. Childrenís Friends. When cadets become personal friends and a member of one of the families
is an adult leader, the adult leaderís interactions with their childís friend outside of CAP activities in
a non-CAP capacity are not improper. However, all CPP standards of practice will continue to apply during
CAP activities.


CPP applies to CAP activities, including traveling to/from.

Quote
There are numerous instances where someone can develop into being a personal mentor, granted there is no overstep in their relationship in CAP and with legal guardians (e.g., a senior member who tutors someone, helps them through substance abuse, etc.). That's a personal matter outside of CAP.

No, it's not.

See above.

Professional relationships apply.

Quote
If you travel with a cadet, that's between you and that cadet's parents.

No, it isn't.

g. Transportation. If an adult leader transports cadets other than his or her family members or
cadets known through relationships existing prior to their CAP membership to, from, or during a CAP
activity, the party must number at least three (adult leader driver plus two cadets; or adult leader driver,
second adult leader, and one cadet). See 2-7c for details on prior relationships. Regarding liability insurance,
transportation to and from CAP activities via member-owned vehicles is not considered part of
official travel and is therefore conducted at the memberís risk


Three-Deep rule applies.

Quote
There are ways to "CYA" on having someone else's kid in your car. But that's getting too detailed for what this topic is. As for your sister inviting friends over, there's nothing wrong with you sitting in the living when they're all hanging around in the living room. It's just a matter of how far you take that relationship. If there is any suggestion that it's becoming intimate between you and one of those cadets, it's a problem in CAP (regardless of what the law may say).

Spending time with cadets outside of CAP could well be considered a boundary violation as a minimum,
and is not a good idea.

Yes.  When you turn 18, you have decisions to make, at least in a CAP context.

5. Childrenís Friends. When cadets become personal friends and a member of one of the families
is an adult leader, the adult leaderís interactions with their childís friend outside of CAP activities in
a non-CAP capacity are not improper. However, all CPP standards of practice will continue to apply during
CAP activities.


It goes right back to this. It's not improper to be around a cadet in a non-CAP activity. It's up to the adult to be responsible in keeping the contact appropriate.

Quote
You can be friends with cadets as a senior member. Friends is a loose term. But you need to watch that relationship and make sure it doesn't go too far.
No, you really can't. It's a conflict of interest from both perspectives, and for every anecdotal "but I knew this one..."
there's 10 examples that go sideways, either in spectacular, media-related ways, or more generally, subtle, less
obvious ones.

This goes back to everything up above. "Friends" doesn't need to be people chatting on social media. You can be friends and maintain a professional relationship. Don't make it out to be more than it is. We don't need to get into making definitions here; CAP already has definitions provided in its policy.

If your friendship does not violate any of these policies, then you have a mutual, appropriate relationship in CAP. In fact, the CPPT slides from NHQ state: Seniors are Like Teachers. Senior members are a mentor, not an adversary.

Quote
Time for you to review the Cadet Protection regulations.

I think the regulations clearly backed up all of this.

Try reviewing the PowerPoints from the website:
http://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/Cadet_Protection_Basic__slides_09E39B8D2C1A7.pdf
https://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/Cadet_Protection_Basic__classroom_s_89B8883AFEC66.pdf

Cadet protection is an extremely big deal, as well as a big responsibility, which needs to be instructed precisely to the regulation. CAP has training tools available with further expound on the regulation, providing examples and scenarios for reference. There is no need for "But I knew this one..." It's covered. You either can or you can't. Let's leave the dramatic scenarios out of it (like a cadet not having been picked up after a meeting and everyone else left).
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Ned
Resident Philosopher

Posts: 2,184

« Reply #27 on: January 09, 2018, 01:13:01 PM »

As a legal type guy and the primary author of some of what we are discussing here, I enjoy a hair-splitting theoretical argument as much as the next guy.  Maybe more. And much of what Bob and Skyhornet have said is both true, and not, depending on the context.

The BoG created the CPP to limit risk to cadets, and part of that is severely limiting contact between seniors and cadets outside of CAP activities (at which the two deep and other CPP policies apply), with a few necessary exceptions like the above-discussed prior and professional relationships, chance encounters, etc..  The basic rule is "no clear exception means no contact."

I did want to address one comment that seemed to imply that a senior could spend substantial time "mentoring", tutoring, or "helping" a cadet outside of CAP activities under the "professional relationship" exception.  (If that is not what you meant to say, I apologize for misreading it.)

And without further information,  that would be an incorrect interpretation.  Sure, we could add some hypothetical facts like the senior is a professional therapist counselor and the cadet just happens to be part of the senior's practice, or maybe they were both enrolled in Big Brothers, and the cadet had been matched as the senior's "little."  Or some other unusual hypothetical facts.

But an ordinary senior member may not spend substantial time with a CAP cadet outside of CAP activities for plain vanilla "mentoring."  Otherwise, the exception would eat the rule.  "Um, we wasn't being peer-to-peer friends or engaged in a romantic relationship, we was, ummm, mentoring.  Yeah, that's the ticket.  I was mentoring the cadet while we were hanging out chilling. You can't discipline me."

I can and do mentor and coach cadets.  I think it is one of the most rewarding things I do, frankly.  But I do it at CAP activities, following the rules.  And not on extended phone calls, IMs, or in-person visits or meetings away from CAP.

Please keep teaching, mentoring, and coaching our cadets.  You are truly making a difference in America's future.

Just follow the rules.


Ned Lee
National Cadet Program Manager

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Alaric
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 781

« Reply #28 on: January 09, 2018, 02:26:20 PM »

As a legal type guy and the primary author of some of what we are discussing here, I enjoy a hair-splitting theoretical argument as much as the next guy.  Maybe more. And much of what Bob and Skyhornet have said is both true, and not, depending on the context.

The BoG created the CPP to limit risk to cadets, and part of that is severely limiting contact between seniors and cadets outside of CAP activities (at which the two deep and other CPP policies apply), with a few necessary exceptions like the above-discussed prior and professional relationships, chance encounters, etc..  The basic rule is "no clear exception means no contact."

I did want to address one comment that seemed to imply that a senior could spend substantial time "mentoring", tutoring, or "helping" a cadet outside of CAP activities under the "professional relationship" exception.  (If that is not what you meant to say, I apologize for misreading it.)

And without further information,  that would be an incorrect interpretation.  Sure, we could add some hypothetical facts like the senior is a professional therapist counselor and the cadet just happens to be part of the senior's practice, or maybe they were both enrolled in Big Brothers, and the cadet had been matched as the senior's "little."  Or some other unusual hypothetical facts.

But an ordinary senior member may not spend substantial time with a CAP cadet outside of CAP activities for plain vanilla "mentoring."  Otherwise, the exception would eat the rule.  "Um, we wasn't being peer-to-peer friends or engaged in a romantic relationship, we was, ummm, mentoring.  Yeah, that's the ticket.  I was mentoring the cadet while we were hanging out chilling. You can't discipline me."

I can and do mentor and coach cadets.  I think it is one of the most rewarding things I do, frankly.  But I do it at CAP activities, following the rules.  And not on extended phone calls, IMs, or in-person visits or meetings away from CAP.

Please keep teaching, mentoring, and coaching our cadets.  You are truly making a difference in America's future.

Just follow the rules.


Ned Lee
National Cadet Program Manager

If people are worried about the line, join a senior squadron where you will likely not be in contact with cadets (except for O-rides) or establish yourself in a specialty that does not cross over with CP (Finance, Personnel, Professional Development all leap to mind).  Whereas I believe our CPPT is a huge overreach and a direct product of the Nanny State environment the country seems to like, those are the rules.  We follow them or we get out.
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TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,192

« Reply #29 on: January 09, 2018, 02:36:07 PM »

As a legal type guy and the primary author of some of what we are discussing here, I enjoy a hair-splitting theoretical argument as much as the next guy.  Maybe more. And much of what Bob and Skyhornet have said is both true, and not, depending on the context.

The BoG created the CPP to limit risk to cadets, and part of that is severely limiting contact between seniors and cadets outside of CAP activities (at which the two deep and other CPP policies apply), with a few necessary exceptions like the above-discussed prior and professional relationships, chance encounters, etc..  The basic rule is "no clear exception means no contact."

I did want to address one comment that seemed to imply that a senior could spend substantial time "mentoring", tutoring, or "helping" a cadet outside of CAP activities under the "professional relationship" exception.  (If that is not what you meant to say, I apologize for misreading it.)

And without further information,  that would be an incorrect interpretation.  Sure, we could add some hypothetical facts like the senior is a professional therapist counselor and the cadet just happens to be part of the senior's practice, or maybe they were both enrolled in Big Brothers, and the cadet had been matched as the senior's "little."  Or some other unusual hypothetical facts.

But an ordinary senior member may not spend substantial time with a CAP cadet outside of CAP activities for plain vanilla "mentoring."  Otherwise, the exception would eat the rule.  "Um, we wasn't being peer-to-peer friends or engaged in a romantic relationship, we was, ummm, mentoring.  Yeah, that's the ticket.  I was mentoring the cadet while we were hanging out chilling. You can't discipline me."

I can and do mentor and coach cadets.  I think it is one of the most rewarding things I do, frankly.  But I do it at CAP activities, following the rules.  And not on extended phone calls, IMs, or in-person visits or meetings away from CAP.

Please keep teaching, mentoring, and coaching our cadets.  You are truly making a difference in America's future.

Just follow the rules.


Ned Lee
National Cadet Program Manager

It was a misinterpretation due to how I worded it, and I totally see how that triggered everything. We're on the same page here.

I think the PowerPoint deck does a great deal of justice to back up 52-10 in regard to the point that you can do these things as an adult, but not as a senior member in CAP, and if you want to remain a senior member in CAP, then you need to forfeit certain practices.

For example:
CAP is not telling the mom who she can or cannot allow to transport her child.
However, CAP is saying that if an adult wants to be a senior member, he or she must
comply with the transportation rule of three because it is such an effective way to
thwart a would-be abuserís efforts to isolate and groom a potential victim.


I think that's a pretty spot on principle that applies across the board. CAP is not telling parents what their kids can/can't do, or who they can hang out with. CAP is, however, telling senior members, that if they want to be part of this organization, they still have to apply these practices despite what mom says. It's a boundary.

So we're tracking here, Ned. We're all getting caught up in word games.

If people are worried about the line, join a senior squadron where you will likely not be in contact with cadets (except for O-rides) or establish yourself in a specialty that does not cross over with CP (Finance, Personnel, Professional Development all leap to mind).  Whereas I believe our CPPT is a huge overreach and a direct product of the Nanny State environment the country seems to like, those are the rules.  We follow them or we get out.

This.

This applies to everything, not just the CPP---uniforms, promotions, all of it. One's opinion of how it should be does not change how it is on this date at this moment.
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Cadetter
Seasoned Member

Posts: 223

« Reply #30 on: January 09, 2018, 02:45:48 PM »

As a 17-yo cadet, I appreciate it when SMs pay attention to CPPT. I'm good personal friends with one 22 yo SM, but we met before joining CAP, although we've shared a substantial amount of contact during our intersecting 4 years as cadets. Sometimes CPP rules seem silly in a given circumstance, but it's better to be safe than sorry. Most of CPP isn't seriously inconvenient for the majority of members, in my very limited experience, and if extra caution in 100 cases can prevent abuse in one, it would be worth it for me.
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Wright Brothers Award, 2013
Billy Mitchell Award, 2016
Earhart Award, 2018

Planned: Eaker Award, late 2018 or early 2019; Spaatz Award, summer 2019
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CAP Talk  |  Cadet Programs  |  Cadet Programs Management & Activities  |  Topic: CPPT Gray Area??
 


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