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May 22, 2018, 02:13:34 AM
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CAP Talk  |  Recent Posts
CAP Talk  |  Recent Posts
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 1 
 on: Today at 12:29:21 AM 
Started by Eclipse - Last post by Fubar
I would argue that they (NHQ) change the mandatory minimum uniform from service dress to the field uniform.

How about ditching this entirely? As a volunteer force who pays for all their own uniforms and equipment, why not have us just buy what we need?

 2 
 on: Yesterday at 11:35:46 PM 
Started by NIN - Last post by etodd
I missed the webinar while it was live, but just watched it now. Great job Nin. You covered lots of ground with good info. I downloaded the sample kit and will say I'm impressed. I haven't seen any other Squadron take it to this level. I'll be stealing a few ideas. :)

 3 
 on: Yesterday at 11:20:12 PM 
Started by Eclipse - Last post by Eclipse
http://www.engineerguy.com/airship/

"Fatal Flight brings vividly to life the year of operation of R.101, the last great British airship—a luxury liner three and a half times the length of a 747 jet, with a spacious lounge, a dining room that seated fifty, glass-walled promenade decks, and a smoking room. The British expected R.101 to spearhead a fleet of imperial airships that would dominate the skies as British naval ships, a century earlier, had ruled the seas. The dream ended when, on its demonstration flight to India, R.101 crashed in France, tragically killing nearly all aboard.
    Combining meticulous research with superb storytelling, Fatal Flight guides us from the moment the great airship emerged from its giant shed—nearly the largest building in the British Empire—to soar on its first flight, to its last fateful voyage. The full story behind R.101 shows that, although it was a failure, it was nevertheless a supremely imaginative human creation. The technical achievement of creating R.101 reveals the beauty, majesty, and, of course, the sorrow of the human experience."



 4 
 on: Yesterday at 10:20:52 PM 
Started by cpyahoo - Last post by PHall
And yet some Wing LOs guard that turf zealously.
They have no turf to guard.  As Eclipse pointed out, it is the ES officers job to talk to local officials and there are almost no circumstances where any sort of official agreement is needed (and hasn't been for 10+ years).  Going to sit down with the sherrif and giving him the NOC's number is about all you need to do.
OK. But that is not the situation here.

And where is "here"?

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 09:56:25 PM 
Started by Cadet Officer - Last post by Cadet Officer
I said that because honestly I was I spend at least two hours a day working on CAP stuff from home and on average two or more days a week doing in person work. I can tell that because I am the vice chair for CAC the Deputy commander for our encampment the assistant to the Cadet Program Cadet for the wing and the wing cadet PAO. Since we have no other Wing Cadet slots and I am in the second highest position in each I can tell and have been told by many Wing Directors

You are hyper-engaged, and should be commended for that.  Good on 'ye.

Being on the Wing CAC, or any other staff role, doesn't make you the #2 cadet in the wing. 
You might be oen of the more / most active and "around", that doesn't necessarily make you
and better (or worse) then any other cadet.

And honestly, it might be time to dial-back just a bit.  CAP is great, but it isn't the end-all / be all,
and I've seen plenty of cadets who do "everything" only to find that they missed a lot of
other things, or ticket-punched their way through the program, missing many lessons.

It's tired cliche, but for cadets it's supposed to be the journey.

I wasn't saying I was better just with activeness in the wing Im the second and of those active rank wise. A lot has been pushed onto me being no one to fill it especially in the squadron. Yes I can tell I've missed things I see people who started at the same time as me enjoying but I have been given so many other great opportunities it makes up for it. It is a journey and we all take our own way through it.


 6 
 on: Yesterday at 09:52:15 PM 
Started by Cadet Officer - Last post by Eclipse
I said that because honestly I was I spend at least two hours a day working on CAP stuff from home and on average two or more days a week doing in person work. I can tell that because I am the vice chair for CAC the Deputy commander for our encampment the assistant to the Cadet Program Cadet for the wing and the wing cadet PAO. Since we have no other Wing Cadet slots and I am in the second highest position in each I can tell and have been told by many Wing Directors

You are hyper-engaged, and should be commended for that.  Good on 'ye.

Being on the Wing CAC, or any other staff role, doesn't make you the #2 cadet in the wing. 
You might be oen of the more / most active and "around", that doesn't necessarily make you
and better (or worse) then any other cadet.

And honestly, it might be time to dial-back just a bit.  CAP is great, but it isn't the end-all / be all,
and I've seen plenty of cadets who do "everything" only to find that they missed a lot of
other things, or ticket-punched their way through the program, missing many lessons.

It's tired cliche, but for cadets it's supposed to be the journey.

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 09:48:36 PM 
Started by Cadet Officer - Last post by Cadet Officer
Once again wasn't using it as an excuse simply that I would allow cadets to come up and ask me something if they needed it while I was testing (Thus bettering them because they then knew how to deal with the situation)

That's arguably a Test Control violation, both for you taking the test (you deserve an uninterrupted place to take it),
and their potential to see test questions.

No one is saying you're "lazy", but one could certainly ask where the TCO was and why he would allow that to happen.
It wasn't a violation I was sitting at a desk with the computer facing me and they were on the other side of the computer. The Testing Officer was supervising and would answer some questions but in a squadron with a lot of new cadets and a lot of new senior members when were the only two people who really knew the answers its kinda hard to get that space.

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 09:45:47 PM 
Started by Cadet Officer - Last post by Cadet Officer
+1 the above, it's a common excuse cadets make to either not progress at all, or when they struggle
that they are "too busy helping others".  Mentoring is part of the equation, but as a cadet your primary
focus is supposed to be your own progression and growth, as you are perishable, and there are
senior members whose job it is to help struggling cadets.

I am the top cadet in my squadron and second in the wing.

How would you be able to judge you're the #2 cadet in your wing?

I said that because honestly I was I spend at least two hours a day working on CAP stuff from home and on average two or more days a week doing in person work.

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 09:43:18 PM 
Started by Cadet Officer - Last post by Eclipse
Once again wasn't using it as an excuse simply that I would allow cadets to come up and ask me something if they needed it while I was testing (Thus bettering them because they then knew how to deal with the situation)

That's arguably a Test Control violation, both for you taking the test (you deserve an uninterrupted place to take it),
and their potential to see test questions.

No one is saying you're "lazy", but one could certainly ask where the TCO was and why he would allow that to happen.

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 09:42:33 PM 
Started by cpyahoo - Last post by OldGuy
And yet some Wing LOs guard that turf zealously.
They have no turf to guard.  As Eclipse pointed out, it is the ES officers job to talk to local officials and there are almost no circumstances where any sort of official agreement is needed (and hasn't been for 10+ years).  Going to sit down with the sherrif and giving him the NOC's number is about all you need to do.
OK. But that is not the situation here.

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