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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Safety  |  Topic: drugs, smoking and drinking underage
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yangsiyui
Recruit

Posts: 9
Unit: ky -216

« on: October 01, 2016, 08:22:07 PM »

So I was listening to the radio and they where taking about underage smoking and stuff along those lines, and that got me to thinking what if I see anyone underage smoking, drinking or useing drugs? I read somewhere about that the police don't really do anything but take the cigerets and if they get caught multiple times they will get a fine. I was wandering what I should do, I don't want to ignore it.

I will also bring this up next meating.
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Levi Lockling
Seasoned Member

Posts: 286
Unit: AZ-085

« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2016, 08:44:44 PM »

While I commend your desire to help everyone in these regards, it's simply a fact of life that not everyone wants that help. A lot of people smoke and drink underage, and however much you may not like that fact, that's just how it is. Police have established norms when it comes to these things, and if all you can do is tell the police, then that's all you can do. But you can't just go around taking everyone's booze, smokes, or whatever else, just because you don't like it. All you can do is take the high road and live your life according to the core values while trying to instill those values into others. If they just continue on the path they're on.... Then there's just not much you can do.
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1stLt Levi H. Lockling
SrA, USAF, 1A851J
Charlie flight, NBB 2013
Hyperion
Recruit

Posts: 33

« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2016, 04:00:40 AM »

If a cadet is bringing illegal substances to a CAP activity or arriving high / drunk, then their commander will follow their training and perform the necessary administrative procedures to 1) control the incident and 2) discipline the cadet. This shouldn't be something other officers (nor especially other cadets) should worry about--leave this to the commander. They will know what to do.

Preferably, the commander should work with the cadet on rehabilitation and not immediately go nuclear with a 2-B. Teenagers, even cadets, make mistakes--it's part of growing up. A loss of rank, position, or other such treatment may be necessary to reinforce the seriousness of the situation, but there should always be a way for the cadet to redeem themselves unless the first offense was so extreme that they're needed to be removed permanently from CAP. The commander should know what is appropriate.

However, this will almost never occur. Most of the cadets that I've dealt or head of with substance abuse issues typically keep their personal and CAP lives separate. If you're just hearing rumors about a cadet's life outside CAP, then you should leave them alone. Let them know they have a place to chat with someone such as a Chaplain, or if you can help them find a medical physician / medical organization that specializes in teenage issues / substance abuse. However, at the end of the day, as long as it's not affecting them or others in CAP then I would not worry about it.

CAP officers are not trained on how to handle substance abuse. This is a medical issue for licensed physicians. Don't play a hero; just be understanding and try to direct the cadet to get the help they need. Let the commander do their job on discipline and let the medical physicians do their job on rehabilitation. This isn't something to worry yourself about.

Summary: it's highly unlikely this will ever happen near you. If it does, inform their commander and then leave it alone. Also, mass media thrives on fear.
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To serve in silence.
Levi Lockling
Seasoned Member

Posts: 286
Unit: AZ-085

« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2016, 11:43:15 PM »

If a cadet is bringing illegal substances to a CAP activity or arriving high / drunk, then their commander will follow their training and perform the necessary administrative procedures to 1) control the incident and 2) discipline the cadet. This shouldn't be something other officers (nor especially other cadets) should worry about--leave this to the commander. They will know what to do.

Preferably, the commander should work with the cadet on rehabilitation and not immediately go nuclear with a 2-B. Teenagers, even cadets, make mistakes--it's part of growing up. A loss of rank, position, or other such treatment may be necessary to reinforce the seriousness of the situation, but there should always be a way for the cadet to redeem themselves unless the first offense was so extreme that they're needed to be removed permanently from CAP. The commander should know what is appropriate.

However, this will almost never occur. Most of the cadets that I've dealt or head of with substance abuse issues typically keep their personal and CAP lives separate. If you're just hearing rumors about a cadet's life outside CAP, then you should leave them alone. Let them know they have a place to chat with someone such as a Chaplain, or if you can help them find a medical physician / medical organization that specializes in teenage issues / substance abuse. However, at the end of the day, as long as it's not affecting them or others in CAP then I would not worry about it.

CAP officers are not trained on how to handle substance abuse. This is a medical issue for licensed physicians. Don't play a hero; just be understanding and try to direct the cadet to get the help they need. Let the commander do their job on discipline and let the medical physicians do their job on rehabilitation. This isn't something to worry yourself about.

Summary: it's highly unlikely this will ever happen near you. If it does, inform their commander and then leave it alone. Also, mass media thrives on fear.

I understood the question as more of a "CAP cadet exposed to outside world" kind of thing, though you bring up very valid points about what should occur if it is at the squadron and not in the outside world, as I interpreted.
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1stLt Levi H. Lockling
SrA, USAF, 1A851J
Charlie flight, NBB 2013
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award
***
Posts: 27,267

« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2016, 12:04:00 AM »

Set the example, stay away from it yourself, be positive peer pressure for your friends and
beyond that MYOB, sadly you cant fix the world.
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"Effort" does not equal "results".
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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Safety  |  Topic: drugs, smoking and drinking underage
 


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