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Eclipse
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« on: September 08, 2016, 01:23:03 AM »

Or at least everything in the FAA database.

CAP has owned some very interesting aircraft over the years.

Enjoy: http://registry.faa.gov/aircraftinquiry/Name_Results.aspx?Nametxt=CIVIL%20AIR%20PATROL&sort_option=1&PageNo=1

(Example images of various models owned by CAP during its history)














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Luis R. Ramos
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« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2016, 05:44:51 AM »

Interesting pictures. Why not putting the brand and models on the pictures?
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Al Sayre
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Mississippi Wing
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2016, 07:15:23 AM »

It's an AE test, he posts the pictures, you get to identify them...
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Lt Col Al Sayre
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« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2016, 12:32:53 PM »

How did CAP happen to own an aircraft that's been in Austria for at least ten years?  HB-DCU, a Varga 2180 Kachina is supposedly privately owned, and based at Innsbruck-Kranebitten Airport (LOWI), Austria.  See:  http://www.jetphotos.net/showphotos.php?aircraft=Varga+2180+Kachina
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Al Sayre
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Mississippi Wing
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2016, 12:35:24 PM »

I think these are generic type photos, not the actual CAP Aircraft.  Also could belong to an overseas squadron/base flying club...
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Lt Col Al Sayre
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« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2016, 01:32:25 PM »

I think these are generic type photos, not the actual CAP Aircraft.  Also could belong to an overseas squadron/base flying club...

Ah.

Sort of like this historically significant one?


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NIN
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« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2016, 01:39:57 PM »

I think these are generic type photos, not the actual CAP Aircraft.  Also could belong to an overseas squadron/base flying club...

Apparently California Wing had one circa before 2004 and used to tow gliders at Los Alamitos, and then a CAP-USAF guy bought one: http://www.vg21squadron.com/issue_50.htm

And Alaska Wing had one, a 1979, N8288J, that they sold circa 1994.

The FAA list is filled with some interesting registrations for CAP:

The various highwing Cessnas, Aeroncas, Taylorcraft, Pipers, Stinsons, and such that you expect from after WWII and Korea, (example, an Aeronca 7DC, tail N1403V, belonged to NH Wing until some time in 1956. Neat!).   There are any number of 150s, L-7s and L-16s, J-3s, TriPacers, Champs, etc in that list. Lots of them. And of course gilders of various stripes over the years.  Not to mention newer models of planes (like Maules and Gippslands).  And the current combos of various 172s, 182s, 206s, both turbo, non-turbo, retract, etc.

Then you have a number of planes that we had a small number of in the inventory off and on over the years: Yellow Perils (Boeing E75 Stearmans), Vultee Valiants (oh boy!), Navions, the Alaska bush planes (deHavilland Beavers & Otters), T-34s, L-19s, PT-19s, a Cessna 195 (mmmm), a balloon or five, a few tail-dragger Cessna 185s and such,

Then there's the one-off odd planes that defy understanding of what we were doing with them: 

a Walls KR-1 (thats a kit plane!) from FL.  A 1967 Rockwell Aero Commander 100 (the so-called "Darter Commander", only one of which I've ever even seen!). A Lake L-4 Amphib (my wing had one.. it crashed). A Mooney A2A (Cadet.. 2-place Ercoupe). A Mooney M20.  A even a few twins like the Beech 65 Queen Airs (in the 1990s? really?), an E50 TwinBo and a Beech C-45 Expeditor.

Pretty cool list overall.




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Darin Ninness, Lt Col, CAP
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Luis R. Ramos
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« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2016, 05:59:56 PM »

Yellow Peril?

Afraid to ask how it got that moniker!
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PHall
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« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2016, 08:14:01 PM »

Yellow Peril?

Afraid to ask how it got that moniker!

Research my friend. Do some research!  First hint: It was a trainer.
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Luis R. Ramos
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« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2016, 08:46:38 PM »

After that remark, no need to do research.

Lots of pilots-in-training losing control and getting killed, injured, and/or afraid. Similar to the B-26...
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PHall
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« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2016, 12:38:31 AM »

After that remark, no need to do research.

Lots of pilots-in-training losing control and getting killed, injured, and/or afraid. Similar to the B-26...

The B-26 was perfectly safe to fly, as long as you knew what you were dealing with. i.e. Very High Wing Loading.
Mac Dill Field in Tampa, Fla was a training base for the B-26. The phrase "A plane a day in Tampa Bay" was taken as truth!
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Luis R. Ramos
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« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2016, 07:26:34 PM »

Quote

....perfectly safe to fly, as long as you knew what you were dealing with....


I know that, you know that. But the reputation is there. Apparently many did not know what they were dealing with. So it must have been like the Yellow Peril. Another plane probably someone else said "perfectly safe to fly as long as you knew what you were dealing with."
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