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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Hysterical History  |  Topic: USAF pilots
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THRAWN
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« Reply #40 on: March 17, 2016, 10:02:51 PM »

There was a JAG episode that featured a Herc trapping on the SEAHAWK.

I learned about Pardo's Push in 1967 after randomly watching a JAG episode.

I watched the series soup to nuts. A lot of it was fluff but Catherine Bell made it watchable.
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Strup
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SarDragon
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« Reply #41 on: March 18, 2016, 01:18:24 AM »

A guy I worked for at my first duty station was in the squadron that was involved in that C-130 project. He said the only mod to the plane was beefed up brakes. Everything else was as manufactured.
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Dave Bowles
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Posts: 488

« Reply #42 on: March 18, 2016, 07:57:17 AM »

It was a sneak attack ...


It was in effect but it wasn't planned that way. The ultimatum was supposed to be delivered 20 minutes or so before the attack started. The Japanese miscalculated how long the deciphering and translation would take. On the other hand, credible US sources have us decoding and translating faster than the Japanese were. Do you think anyone would have felt any different toward the Japanese if the ultimatum was delivered on time?

I believe Dec. 7, 1941 was called "a day of infamy" for a purpose.

It is called propaganda. The US was caught with its pants down and the powers-that-be needed to direct the rage of the American people at someone other themselves.

Genocide is bad but before going off on a rampage about Japanese or Germans, I suggest you look into the centuries long effort to exterminate the American Indian by the US government. No country has clean hands when it comes to genocide against another people.
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Garibaldi
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« Reply #43 on: March 18, 2016, 08:22:10 AM »

Did I mention that one of the C-130 pilots who landed on the Forrestal was a former CAP member, from my unit?
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You can't take the sky from me. Also, I can kill you with my brain. No power in the 'verse can stop me.
Luis R. Ramos
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« Reply #44 on: March 18, 2016, 08:33:52 AM »

Garibaldi, your efforts are not succeeding. Turn on the heat!

Anyway, how do you know the pilot was a former member?

Give us more info! Spaatz, Mitchell? When did he join, left? Etc...


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THRAWN
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« Reply #45 on: March 18, 2016, 08:49:00 AM »

Garibaldi, your efforts are not succeeding. Turn on the heat!

Anyway, how do you know the pilot was a former member?

Give us more info! Spaatz, Mitchell? When did he join, left? Etc...

Seconded. And why is he a "former member"? Get him back!
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Strup
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Garibaldi
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« Reply #46 on: March 18, 2016, 09:04:20 AM »

Well, he died a while back. He is known to several members of my unit, and 2 of his sons were in the program. He actually was GAWG CC in 1968. Ted Limmer, his name was.

Here is a link to an article, complete with pictures, of the actual test: http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/025982d.pdf
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You can't take the sky from me. Also, I can kill you with my brain. No power in the 'verse can stop me.
THRAWN
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Posts: 1,807

« Reply #47 on: March 18, 2016, 09:11:06 AM »

Well, he died a while back. He is known to several members of my unit, and 2 of his sons were in the program. He actually was GAWG CC in 1968. Ted Limmer, his name was.

Here is a link to an article, complete with pictures, of the actual test: http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/025982d.pdf

Yeah, kind of hard for him to be safety current at this point.

Thanks for the link!
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Strup
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Luis R. Ramos
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« Reply #48 on: March 18, 2016, 09:53:04 AM »

Does anyone know whether the C-130 could use RATO at this time? Was use of the RATO ever contemplated for this type of event? If so, use at the carrier would have been dangerous?
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Garibaldi
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« Reply #49 on: March 18, 2016, 10:36:28 AM »

I don't think at the time they used JATO or RATO, but it was a tech used in the B-47 if memory serves. The only JATO C-130 I know of is Fat Albert of Blue Angels fame.
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Spam
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« Reply #50 on: March 18, 2016, 12:22:48 PM »

Many of you are familiar with the Blue's Fat Albert (I saw their final show with the bottles party trick in NOV 2011 I think at P'Cola... it was nice).

For an interesting look at the more extreme examples of enhanced C-130s, search the YMC-130H and "Iran Hostage Rescue". One video is available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKCl3lfAx1Q, and the surviving aircraft is (I believe) still at the Museum of Aviation here in sunny Georgia https://www.museumofaviation.org/attractions.php, although I don't believe it is on display currently (we took our unit and a sister unit down there last month, and it was off display, possibly for restoration).  One of a kind example of rapid RDT&E to solve a critical niche.

(In that video link above, my favorite is the deployment shot right at 2 minutes).  "FANGS OUT"...

As far as original thread content (USAF pilots) I have worked with a couple of Naval Aviators and even a USMC guy assigned to fly the F-22, and in return I've worked with a number of USAF guys who flew with USN units (and were CQ'd). Examples include a few USAF guys who went through Whidbey and have been flying AEA missions, to retain USAF core proficiency in that mission set.  They had to get fully CQd. Rhinos and Growlers can do some things that Raptors can't, and of course vice versa, so some cross-pollination is a Very Good Thing.


V/R
Spam


Updated:
The U-2 has even done traps and cats - see the USS Ranger mission to launch and recover a U-2G to recon the French nuclear test site in the Pacific in May of 1964, at http://www.spyflight.co.uk/u-2s.htm.


« Last Edit: March 18, 2016, 12:30:13 PM by Spam » Logged
SarDragon
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« Reply #51 on: March 18, 2016, 01:56:31 PM »

Does anyone know whether the C-130 could use RATO at this time?

Yes, someone knows.  >:D
 
Quote
use of the RATO ever contemplated for this type of event?

To the best of my knowledge, no. It was engines only, or nothing.

Quote
If so, use at the carrier would have been dangerous?

Maybe, but no more than launching a V-2 from the flight deck (1947, Operation Sandy).
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Dave Bowles
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Luis R. Ramos
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« Reply #52 on: March 18, 2016, 03:20:05 PM »

I would argue that having a C-130 use RATO on the Forrestal would be more dangerous than launching the V-2 from a carrier. After all, the V-2 only goes up under thrust. On the C-130 had the RATOs on the right side misfired, the C-130 could have slammed into the island due to asymmetrical thrust...

 ;)


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PHall
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« Reply #53 on: March 18, 2016, 08:26:16 PM »

I don't think at the time they used JATO or RATO, but it was a tech used in the B-47 if memory serves. The only JATO C-130 I know of is Fat Albert of Blue Angels fame.

The LC-130 Ski Birds use JATO to take off from Snow and Ice runways.
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Luis R. Ramos
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« Reply #54 on: March 18, 2016, 09:27:23 PM »

The question I made was whether at the time of the C-130 landing and taking off from the USS Forrestal there were C-130s using RATOs. This happened in 1963...
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PHall
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« Reply #55 on: March 18, 2016, 10:59:35 PM »

The question I made was whether at the time of the C-130 landing and taking off from the USS Forrestal there were C-130s using RATOs. This happened in 1963...

The Germans were using RATO way back in 1939.
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Luis R. Ramos
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« Reply #56 on: March 19, 2016, 06:30:39 PM »

On their C-130's? This is a 1950's aircraft! So are you telling me the Germans created and designed the Hercules?

Wow! I knew the United States used a lot of technology that Germany came up with, but this is a first for me!

I am astounded!

 :o
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Garibaldi
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« Reply #57 on: March 19, 2016, 06:44:26 PM »

I had quite a discussion with my unit historian on the way to a joint SAREX, at about 0615 this morning. Turns out that there were several tests done with RATO on C-130s during the Iranian hostage crisis in 1980. Not sure how classified the info is, but apparently, one other option besides the Desert One fiasco was to outfit a Hercules with some rockets, to facilitate a very short landing and takeoff in a soccer field. Lockheed did some testing, and due to the nature of the rockets, culled from various sources, had several arranged for landing, some for vertical, and some rear facing. The test was less than successful, but the idea carried over somewhat. Some of the older model Hercules still have the wiring but not the hardpoints for the rockets, apparently.
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You can't take the sky from me. Also, I can kill you with my brain. No power in the 'verse can stop me.
PHall
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Posts: 5,807

« Reply #58 on: March 19, 2016, 06:45:28 PM »

On their C-130's? This is a 1950's aircraft! So are you telling me the Germans created and designed the Hercules?

Wow! I knew the United States used a lot of technology that Germany came up with, but this is a first for me!

I am astounded!

 :o

No smart guy. They were using it on the Ar234 Jet Bomber. Also used them on Me 323 Glider.

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PHall
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Posts: 5,807

« Reply #59 on: March 19, 2016, 06:46:28 PM »

I had quite a discussion with my unit historian on the way to a joint SAREX, at about 0615 this morning. Turns out that there were several tests done with RATO on C-130s during the Iranian hostage crisis in 1980. Not sure how classified the info is, but apparently, one other option besides the Desert One fiasco was to outfit a Hercules with some rockets, to facilitate a very short landing and takeoff in a soccer field. Lockheed did some testing, and due to the nature of the rockets, culled from various sources, had several arranged for landing, some for vertical, and some rear facing. The test was less than successful, but the idea carried over somewhat. Some of the older model Hercules still have the wiring but not the hardpoints for the rockets, apparently.

There's a video of that on You Tube. Search C-130 and should find it.
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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Hysterical History  |  Topic: USAF pilots
 


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