Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
May 27, 2017, 09:36:48 AM
Home Help Login Register
News:

CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Uniforms & Awards  |  Topic: Uniform Tips
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 [All] Print
Author Topic: Uniform Tips  (Read 17571 times)
JC004
[Insert Cool Title Here]
Global Moderator

Posts: 4,515

« on: May 12, 2015, 04:36:57 AM »

I'm consolidating some uniform tips to make available (I'd like to include some photos when finished).  Here are some of mine.  Any suggestions?

General Information & Purchasing
  • To acquire Air Force uniform items - coats, jackets, sweaters, belts, shoes, etc., you may use Army Air Force Exchange Services (AAFES) by way of base access to a Military Clothing Sales Store (MCSS), or by phone/fax directly from AAFES.  For more information on CAP member access and eligibility, check the information here.
  • Air Force service uniform trousers come in 2 materials - poly/wool blend and 100% polyester.  100% polyester is a good choice for people who are genuinely allergic to wool, but keep in mind that 100% polyester pants may NOT be worn with AF Shade 1620 (namely, the service coat) - it may only be worn with the light blue service uniform shirt.
  • Air Force service uniform shirts come in 2 materials - the DLATS Air Force issue (inexpensive) shirt, made of polyester/cotton blend; and the "commercial" shirt, made of polyester/wool blend.  The issue shirt is machine washable, and the heavier, higher quality commercial shirt is dry clean only.  When purchasing in-store, you may have to ask for a commercial shirt, as they may be stored in the back.
  • The Air Force-style blue cold weather cap (authorized in CAPM 39-1, section 6.2.6) is available from AAFES, Item # 6639252.
  • Vanguard is CAP's official supplier for items not available through AAFES (insignia, etc.).  Connect with Vanguard on Facebook and Twitter for regular discount codes (usually around 10% off your order).
Ironing
  • Use a pressing cloth when ironing to avoid causing shine on the uniform (I wish that a lot of people knew about this one)
  • Use a mini-iron for difficult-to-iron corners, spaces between insignia, the edges of insignias, etc.  A slim-line attachment works well for uniforms and insignia.
  • Use a sleeve board or seam roll for ironing sleeves.  If unavailable, you can use a CLEAN tightly-rolled towel to press the sleeves.
  • Keep your ironing board cover clean.  Stains can easily transfer to your uniform when ironing.  For a better solution, purchase an ironing pad or blanket and keep it sealed in a plastic bag when not in use.  The pad can also easily be packed for weekend activities, encampments, etc.  These will also allow you to iron on a table or other surface, if necessary.
  • If you have hard water, use distilled water to avoid mineral build-up in and on your iron (unless the manual specifies not to)
  • To iron out difficult wrinkles or creases, place a metal ruler, hemming measuring tool, or aluminum foil under the area to be ironed.  The radiated heat from the bottom will help remove the wrinkle or crease.  USE CAUTION when removing; the metal will be very hot.
Wearing Your Uniform
  • Use a military tuck to deal with excess fabric in your shirt
  • A v-neck white undershirt is required when the Air Force blue shirt is worn open-collar.  However, when worn closed-collar (with a tie), the v-neck will show through thin shirt material.  To eliminate this, wear a white crew neck shirt with closed-collar combinations.
  • Wear shirt garters to keep your shirt tucked tightly and your socks up.  These are available in sets of 2 (Y-shaped; one worn on the outside of each leg) or 4 (2 worn in front, 2 worn in back).
  • Carry a pocket-size stain remover for emergencies.
  • Use a mesh cap block to keep your BDU/Blueberry Suit cap sharp.
  • Choose behind-the-head style earmuffs to accommodate your uniform cap.
Maintenance
  • Trim threads/frays (use curved embroidery scissors for a close cut) and seal with a liquid fray sealant.  Do not burn threads on dress shirts (the burned edge will show).  (Fray Check link)
  • To restore waterproofness of Gore-Tex, use a DWR treatment (available as a pump-spray or wash-in product).  Wash with a DWR detergent such as Nikwax Tech Wash, then restore the water repellant with treatment such as Nikwax Tx Direct (wash-in or spray).
  • You can check the condition of your Gore-Tex's water repellant using a spray bottle of water, or by running the garment under a sink faucet.  If the water soaks in rather than beading off, the garment requires a fresh treatment.
  • Gore-Tex patches are available for rips and tears.
  • Cleaning gunked-up Velcro: Carefully comb through the hooks using a needle or pin, or scrub the hooks using a dry toothbrush.
  • When machine-washing any item with Velcro, make sure both sides are joined. Not only will this prevent stuff from accumulating, it will protect face fabrics from scratching on the hooks.
Storing Uniforms
  • Hang pants upside-down from clamping pant hangers to avoid unwanted creases and wrinkles
  • Do not use thin wire hangers.  Use thicker coat-type hangers for uniform shirts to avoid unwanted creases and rust marks.
  • Use shoe bags to protect your shoes while they are being stored, especially for transport.  A divider adds extra protection by eliminating rubbing/scuffing.
  • To keep your uniforms clean and protected, always keep uniforms in garment bags when not in use.  For wool items, place cedar blocks in the garment bags to protect against moths.  Don't forget your caps:   Flight caps fit in the bottom of your garment bag and a service cap fits in a 2.5 gallon plastic storage bag.  Plastic keeps your uniform protected from dust, dirt, mold spores or other things that might be around your home like pet hair, smoke, or moths.
  • When not in use, place ribbons and insignia in plastic resealable bags to keep them clean.  Pin the insignia to cardboard to avoid scratches from pins rubbing together:


Footwear
  • To restore the color and appearance of the soles and heals on your shoes or boots, use edge dressing (also sold as sole edge polish or color renew).  This is a bottled liquid product.  If you are unable to find edge dressing, you could use liquid instant-shine "polish" in the same way.
  • Use a wet toothbrush to clean difficult-to-clean seams and crevices on boots and shoes.
Insignia
  • Use water-soluble fabric glue (NOT permanent fabric glue) to precisely attach cloth insignia to your uniform prior to sewing.  Pins bunch the fabric; glue allows for a flat, precise attachment.  Use a pen style fabric glue (link), rather than a glue stick, to get a more precise, clean application.  After applying the glue and double-checking your placement measurements, gently place heavy objects (like books) on the insignia for about 3 hours, until it is dry (place the weights straight down; moving them side to side can shift your insignia placement).  Once it is dry, you can sew the insignia and clean up any excess glue with a wet paper towel.
  • Pre-shrink your cloth insignia before sewing them to your uniform.  Place them in your uniform pocket or a lingerie bag to minimize fraying.  Do a final pre-shrinking with an iron on a steam setting.  Your insignia will likely bleed slightly.  You can get the bulk of the excess dye out by washing the insignia in hot water (with hand-washing detergent such as Woolite, if you have it), in your sink, then blotting them dry with a paper towel.
  • When preparing your ribbons, use a Ribbon Checker to figure out which ribbons you have, their proper order, and the proper attachments for those ribbons.  Check CAPR 39-3 for details on award of medals and ribbons.
  • When sliding on ribbons, gently bend the ribbon holder just enough to prevent the ribbon from pulling on the ribbons above and below it.  This prevents excessive shifting of the ribbon fabric, which stretches and distorts the ribbon.
  • If a ribbon becomes distorted or the back fabric begins to show, you can gently pull out the back metal rectangle, straighten the ribbon, and pop it back into place.
  • Make sure your hands are clean when handling ribbons.
  • If you use a commercially-sold fleece for the black CAP fleece jacket, regulations require that any logos be subdued or small.  You can remove embroidered logos with a seam ripper (this is time-consuming, but produces a clean result), or spot-dye the logo black with fabric dye.
  • Use industrial strength sew-on Velcro (available at fabric and craft stores) for leather jackets, fleeces, and flight suits.  Self-adhesive Velcro gums up needles and thread, and can cause damage to a sewing machine.  You can purchase this by the yard.  Use Olive Drab Velcro (available from Vanguard, and elsewhere online) for AF-style flight suits and jackets.  Use black for CAP distinctive flight uniforms, CAP black fleeces, and leather jackets.  Velcro is NOT authorized for other uniforms (such as the BDU); insignia on those uniforms must be sewn on IAW CAPM 39-1.
  • If you have earned a U.S. military badge that is authorized for wear on the Air Force-style uniform, you can have your badges custom-made in ultramarine blue and white to match your CAP insignia (this is optional).  If not available through Vanguard, there are third-party vendors who offer these badges, such as Williams and Williams, Spur Name Tapes, and The BattleZone.
  • Prior to attaching patches (particularly pocket patches), be sure to iron the area first, to avoid fabric bunching.  Use a high setting with steam to encourage any fabric shrinking to take place BEFORE the patch is attached.  As always with ironing, use a pressing cloth.
  • When attaching sleeve braid to the service coat, pull the coat lining up and sew directly to the jacket fabric.  Sewing through the liner can cause fabric bunching.
  • Instead of attaching shoulder and pocket patches with a sewing machine (which leaves a more visible stitch), use a whip stitch and matching thread to hand-sew your patch.  Insert the needle through the edge of the patch border, then bring it over the patch, matching the direction of the patch's thread, and pull it slightly behind the border.  You should get strong, a invisible stitch:
  • To get a crisp, square edge on cloth insignia, and flatten out any show-through of your folded edges, iron a piece of heavy interfacing to the back of your insignia prior to folding over the edges:


  • When folding over the edges on cloth insignia, the fabric will bulge out.  Simply make small slits on the bottom edge to accommodate the extra fabric.  This will keep your edges clean, with no fabric popping out from the bottom.  To secure the edges, tack them down with a fabric glue pen.  You can use liquid fray sealant on the edges: 


What You Need for Uniform Care: The Essentials


What You Need for Uniform Care: Optional/Nice-to-Have Items

What You Need to Do Your Own Sewing
  • Needles
  • Thread (for insignia, use Yale Blue - Coats & Clark color #4470, all-purpose thread).  For AF-style flight suits, Olive Drab or clear thread for plastic insignia (note: clear thread is difficult to manage, as it curls easily, and it breaks easily).  Heavy-duty thread is best for attaching Velcro.  For service uniform alterations or sleeve braid, use navy blue (Coats & Clark color #4900).
  • Water-soluble fabric glue
  • Straight pins
  • Thimble
  • Sewing scissors
  • Sewing machine (highly recommended for clean stitching - an older, used machine from somewhere like Goodwill is sufficient)
  • Sewing gauge and/or clear ruler (preferably both)
  • Seam ripper (optional; highly recommended)
  • Fabric marking pencils (optional; highly recommended)
  • Beeswax (for hand-stitching; makes your threads more stable, sturdy and reduces knotting) (optional)
  • Needle threader (optional)
« Last Edit: May 17, 2015, 09:23:16 PM by JC004 » Logged
JacobAnn
Member

Posts: 71

« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2015, 06:06:54 AM »

These are great tips.  Some I knew, some I did not.  Thank you for sharing.
Logged
JC004
[Insert Cool Title Here]
Global Moderator

Posts: 4,515

« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2015, 06:10:07 AM »

If you have any more, please share.  I'd like to consolidate as many as possible.

I wish that someone had told me about pressing cloths long ago.  Shiny uniforms look awful.   

I'd also like to address any lousy practices.
Logged
NIN
VIP

Posts: 4,446
Unit: of issue

« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2015, 06:53:09 AM »

Wash your BDUs/BBDUs in cold water and avoid tumble drying.  (This is slightly less of a factor now with fabric strip nametags than it was with the old webbed strips)  This keeps your uniform "newer looking," reduces unnecessary shrinkage, and prepares it for ironing.   Hang the uniform to dry before pressing. 

If you're *REALLY* crazy about starching your uniform, use StaFlo or similar starch in a spray bottle mixed down 2:1 water to starch, spray the uniform down after it comes out of the wash on the hangar while you let it hang-dry.  Then press with steam.  You'll like the results.
Logged
Darin Ninness, Lt Col, CAP
Sq Bubba, Wing Dude, National Guy
I like to have Difficult Adult Conversations™
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2017 by NIN. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.
NIN
VIP

Posts: 4,446
Unit: of issue

« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2015, 07:01:13 AM »

When folding insignia, use some lightweight water-soluble craft adhesive to hold the insignia. (actually, I've been using Elmer's Craft Bond for years and its *not* water soluble...whoops!)

Trim the insignia down using pinking shears to reduce fraying.  Lightly dust the backside of the insignia with adhesive (use a box or mom will get mad!). Fold the insignia on parallel sides. Place under a book or something else heavy to hold it for a few minutes (ie. M-1 tank, a handy aircraft carrier, etc). Dust the back again with adhesive, fold the other two sides. Place back under convenient half-track or APC for a few minutes.  Dust one last time, position & measure, then hold until relatively secure. Sew in place (WITH A SEWING MACHINE).

(use something other than Craft Bond, BTW. I've apparently been using the wrong stuff for too long..)
Logged
Darin Ninness, Lt Col, CAP
Sq Bubba, Wing Dude, National Guy
I like to have Difficult Adult Conversations™
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2017 by NIN. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.
Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,013

« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2015, 09:01:08 AM »

When attaching devices on ribbons, break the back prongs off of the devices.  They will break off clean.  Then use white Elmers glue, put small dab on the back of the device with a toothpick.  Then press the device onto the ribbon.  Use a clean toothpick to easily wipe off any excess guy that me squeeze out.  Any small amounts left dry clear.  Your ribbons wont get all warped or distorted by punching the clasp through.  Ive done this for years.  Its sticks grey and your ribbons stay looking sharp.  Elmers Wood Glue works the best, but its yellow.  You just have to be more careful about what squeezes out.   Get an old ribbon and practice it before you go to working on your real set.  If you have fat fingers.... use a pair of tweezers or needle nose pliers to set the device on the ribbon.  You don't want to slide it into place. 
Logged
JC004
[Insert Cool Title Here]
Global Moderator

Posts: 4,515

« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2015, 11:09:52 AM »

When attaching devices on ribbons, break the back prongs off of the devices.  They will break off clean.  Then use white Elmers glue, put small dab on the back of the device with a toothpick.  Then press the device onto the ribbon.  Use a clean toothpick to easily wipe off any excess guy that me squeeze out.  Any small amounts left dry clear.  Your ribbons wont get all warped or distorted by punching the clasp through.  Ive done this for years.  Its sticks grey and your ribbons stay looking sharp.  Elmers Wood Glue works the best, but its yellow.  You just have to be more careful about what squeezes out.   Get an old ribbon and practice it before you go to working on your real set.  If you have fat fingers.... use a pair of tweezers or needle nose pliers to set the device on the ribbon.  You don't want to slide it into place.

UltraThin uses tweezers to place their attachments on the ribbons.  It does take some practice, but many squadrons likely have some old, dirty ribbons that have little use beyond acting as a practice piece.
Logged
kwe1009
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 608

« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2015, 03:39:21 PM »

When attaching devices on ribbons, break the back prongs off of the devices.  They will break off clean.  Then use white Elmers glue, put small dab on the back of the device with a toothpick.  Then press the device onto the ribbon.  Use a clean toothpick to easily wipe off any excess guy that me squeeze out.  Any small amounts left dry clear.  Your ribbons wont get all warped or distorted by punching the clasp through.  Ive done this for years.  Its sticks grey and your ribbons stay looking sharp.  Elmers Wood Glue works the best, but its yellow.  You just have to be more careful about what squeezes out.   Get an old ribbon and practice it before you go to working on your real set.  If you have fat fingers.... use a pair of tweezers or needle nose pliers to set the device on the ribbon.  You don't want to slide it into place.

UltraThin uses tweezers to place their attachments on the ribbons.  It does take some practice, but many squadrons likely have some old, dirty ribbons that have little use beyond acting as a practice piece.

A small pair of needle nosed pliers work well too and have a better gripping surface.
Logged
Flying Pig
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,013

« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2015, 03:45:28 PM »

^^true.  Just don't get the grungy pair out of daddy's tool box :).
Logged
kwe1009
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 608

« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2015, 04:25:37 PM »

^^true.  Just don't get the grungy pair out of daddy's tool box :).

Definitely.  I have a pair that I keep in my uniform box with all of my other supplies like thread and extra frogs.
Logged
ProdigalJim
Seasoned Member

Posts: 476
Unit: MER-VA-082

Aviation Week
« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2015, 08:33:00 PM »

James, as usual you've nailed it. Awesome list!
Logged
Jim Mathews, Maj., CAP
Deputy Commander
VAWG Group 3
My Mitchell Has Four Digits...
abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,257
Unit: Classified

« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2015, 12:46:11 AM »

Don't use any type of floor wax on your shoes/boots.

Don't use edge dressing to shine your shoes/boots.

Use a seam gauge when you do your measurements for insignia.

Always wear thick boot socks when wearing boots.

You only need at the most 4 shirt garters for your blues shirt. 

Dry clean pants and service coat.  (Yes some pants can be washed but dry cleaning is the preferred method)

Logged
HGjunkie
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,610

« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2015, 01:10:32 AM »

Always wear thick boot socks when wearing boots.
Depends on the sock, UA makes some mean boot socks which are thin and extremely comfortable. Also depends on the boot, get good boots and you won't ever worry about it.

Other:
Invest in dry cleaning for blues, tailoring for the shirts (it really looks 100x better than just tucking it)

Edge dressing will work wonders on the edges of your shoes, just not any other part of them.

Get the shirt garters that wrap around your foot instead of the other kind

Corframs will last for years if you treat them well

Use backing on ALL your insignia (even service coat, it works and looks sharper than nothing)

Sew down the pockets on your blues shirt, they're useless and look bad when they stick out
Logged
•••
C2C USAFA
abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,257
Unit: Classified

« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2015, 01:26:51 AM »

Depends on the sock, UA makes some mean boot socks which are thin and extremely comfortable. Also depends on the boot, get good boots and you won't ever worry about it.

Yeah no I wear and have worn nothing but high quality boots for 16 years both in CAP and my day job.  Thick boot socks are a key factor in preventing many issues that can develop with your feet from wearing boots.  The money is well spent on both items and go along way in preventing other issues down the road. 

Logged
Mordecai
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 942
Unit: SI

« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2015, 01:29:24 AM »

Hrm. As a cadet I was just told to wear two pairs of socks.
Logged
abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,257
Unit: Classified

« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2015, 01:38:32 AM »

Hrm. As a cadet I was just told to wear two pairs of socks.

Your feet and back. I always wore boot socks even as a cadet and good boots.
Logged
JC004
[Insert Cool Title Here]
Global Moderator

Posts: 4,515

« Reply #16 on: May 16, 2015, 03:48:18 AM »

I would not recommend wearing 2 pairs of socks to anyone, especially if they're cotton.  They are likely to separate and can rub, causing blisters and such.  The only exception I'd make would be to say sock liners are fine because they're skin tight and thin.

I plan to include footwear choice recommendations in my final printable version.  I have taught members how to choose socks, boots, and shoes as part of uniform classes and GT gear classes.  That includes considerations like material types for socks, construction of shoes/boots based on your individual needs (say, if you have foot/ankle/knee/back issues, or if you pronate/supinate), if you have dry skin or sweat a lot, etc.

I wear SmartWool socks for boots, pretty much exclusively.  I also have some Under Armour boot socks that I got from AAFES Clothing Sales.
Logged
HGjunkie
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,610

« Reply #17 on: May 16, 2015, 03:04:24 PM »

I have some boot suggestions:
Bates Delta 8's with their adjustable support insole (mine are going strong after 4 years of regular CAP wear).
Rocky C4T's and S2V's - very popular here at the zoo (I have some C4's they're great)
Literally anything other than jungle boots
Belleville (700?) flight boots
Corcoran marauders - NOT the all leather variant, the cloth and leather one. (also decently comfortable but pricier).
Logged
•••
C2C USAFA
LSThiker
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,666
Unit: Earth

« Reply #18 on: May 16, 2015, 04:34:34 PM »

I would not recommend wearing 2 pairs of socks to anyone, especially if they're cotton.

I would not recommend wearing cotton anything if you can avoid it. It is a horrible fabric. For tbe undershirt, wear polyester. For the socks, either merino wool or polyester.

For those that do not know, cotton when wet is horrible at retaining heat. In addition, it takes a long time to dry. Polyester is better at retaining heat and is quicker to dry. In addition, it is typically lighter than cotton. Wool has fantastic heating abilities when wet. The down side is that it is heavy and can a while to dry. Merino wool is more breathable and does dry faster than regular wool.

Backpackers are pretty much straight anti-cotton clothing.
Logged
JC004
[Insert Cool Title Here]
Global Moderator

Posts: 4,515

« Reply #19 on: May 16, 2015, 08:01:50 PM »

I would not recommend wearing 2 pairs of socks to anyone, especially if they're cotton.

I would not recommend wearing cotton anything if you can avoid it. It is a horrible fabric. For tbe undershirt, wear polyester. For the socks, either merino wool or polyester.

For those that do not know, cotton when wet is horrible at retaining heat. In addition, it takes a long time to dry. Polyester is better at retaining heat and is quicker to dry. In addition, it is typically lighter than cotton. Wool has fantastic heating abilities when wet. The down side is that it is heavy and can a while to dry. Merino wool is more breathable and does dry faster than regular wool.

Backpackers are pretty much straight anti-cotton clothing.

I had "Cotton Kills" on about 3 slides of my most recent presentation on selecting cold weather clothing.

This is when goons from Cotton Incorporated showed up at my front door, attempted to smother me with a bag of cotton, and told me that I had to replace it with their "Cotton - the fabric of our lives" song.

Before leaving, they branded me with their trademark:
Logged
MSG Mac
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,721
Unit: MER-MD-071

« Reply #20 on: May 16, 2015, 08:37:22 PM »

When blousing your trousers, blouse them from the inside. This keeps the trousers from riding up or becoming unbloused.

1. Put on trousers
2. put on boots
3. Lower the trousers, create an inside cuff and wrap the blousing band* around your cuff and boot.
4. Raise trousers, buckle belt.
 The trousers will be taut when pulled up.

*Use the Velcro 1 inch blousing bands.
Logged
Michael P. McEleney
Lt Col CAP
MSG USA (Retired)
LSThiker
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,666
Unit: Earth

« Reply #21 on: May 16, 2015, 11:18:54 PM »

This is when goons from Cotton Incorporated showed up at my front door, attempted to smother me with a bag of cotton, and told me that I had to replace it with their "Cotton - the fabric of our lives" song.

Well, if they send Zooey Deschanel.........{wondering how many times I can type no cotton}
Logged
abdsp51
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,257
Unit: Classified

« Reply #22 on: May 16, 2015, 11:43:07 PM »

When blousing your trousers, blouse them from the inside. This keeps the trousers from riding up or becoming unbloused.

1. Put on trousers
2. put on boots
3. Lower the trousers, create an inside cuff and wrap the blousing band* around your cuff and boot.
4. Raise trousers, buckle belt.
 The trousers will be taut when pulled up.

*Use the Velcro 1 inch blousing bands.

Or you can place the issue GI bands into the cuff and crimp together.  Instant blousing and last for awhile. 
I agree velcro bands work wonders for blousing.
Logged
jhighman
Recruit

Posts: 29
Unit: GLR-OH-085

« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2015, 12:07:30 AM »

When blousing your trousers, blouse them from the inside. This keeps the trousers from riding up or becoming unbloused.

1. Put on trousers
2. put on boots
3. Lower the trousers, create an inside cuff and wrap the blousing band* around your cuff and boot.
4. Raise trousers, buckle belt.
 The trousers will be taut when pulled up.

*Use the Velcro 1 inch blousing bands.

Or you can place the issue GI bands into the cuff and crimp together.  Instant blousing and last for awhile. 
I agree velcro bands work wonders for blousing.

This trick is also quite helpful for those who are in the awful habit of wrapping their extra long boot laces around the tops of their boots. Instead, after lowering your trousers per these instructions, draw the laces as tight as you like and tie your first bow. Take the long ears and pull them up your leg. When you blouse the trousers with the band, also wrap them around the surplus boot lace.

It will take a little getting used to, but looks so much more squared away.
Logged
JC004
[Insert Cool Title Here]
Global Moderator

Posts: 4,515

« Reply #24 on: May 17, 2015, 08:45:44 AM »

I use the 2 inch Velcro elastic bands and fold them in half.

I'm pretty sure my Infantry Combat Boots came with instructions that said to wrap the laces around.  But it would be faaaaaaaar from the first time I ignored an instruction booklet.
Logged
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,637

« Reply #25 on: May 17, 2015, 11:08:07 AM »

There are many, many ways to blouse boots. Take ten people and you will find ten different ways to do it.
And every one of them is the "right" way....     As long as the results meet the requirements of CAPM 39-1, who cares how you did it?
Logged
lordmonar
Too Much Free Time Award
***
Posts: 10,556

« Reply #26 on: May 17, 2015, 01:11:41 PM »

There are many, many ways to blouse boots. Take ten people and you will find ten different ways to do it.
And every one of them is the "right" way....     As long as the results meet the requirements of CAPM 39-1, who cares how you did it?
+1
Logged
PATRICK M. HARRIS, SMSgt, CAP
Pacific Region
JC004
[Insert Cool Title Here]
Global Moderator

Posts: 4,515

« Reply #27 on: May 17, 2015, 07:52:36 PM »

AAFES is unloading their woodland color blousing bands for half the price of Vanguard.  We should stock up.

I've been doing a BUNCH of edits to the master list of tips above.  Additions are welcome.  I'd like to make a printable packet that can be shared.

39-1 should not exist in a vacuum.  People who don't have a military or cadet background are easily overwhelmed and confused by 39-1.  Having tutorial-type information provides context and fills the gaps.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2015, 08:19:56 PM by JC004 » Logged
lordmonar
Too Much Free Time Award
***
Posts: 10,556

« Reply #28 on: May 17, 2015, 08:55:45 PM »

I'm leery of a "list of uniform tips" because "good ideas" and "short cuts that worked for me" slowly become "this is the only acceptable way of doing XYZ".
Logged
PATRICK M. HARRIS, SMSgt, CAP
Pacific Region
Mela_007
Member

Posts: 82
Unit: MS-048

« Reply #29 on: May 23, 2015, 01:56:57 PM »

Thanks for sharing!  These are great.
Logged
"Worry is the Darkroom in which negatives develop."  -Unknown
Sapper168
Seasoned Member

Posts: 319
Unit: GLR-IL-036

« Reply #30 on: May 23, 2015, 04:25:53 PM »

I'm leery of a "list of uniform tips" because "good ideas" and "short cuts that worked for me" slowly become "this is the only acceptable way of doing XYZ".

CAP Urban Legends.

Have ran across this with cadets in my squadron, especially when it comes to utilizing cargo pockets and pockets on the bdu top.  Somehow It went from "It looks better when they are empty" to "the regs prohibit you from using those pockets."   
Logged
Essayons!
NorCal21
Forum Regular

Posts: 168

« Reply #31 on: May 23, 2015, 05:58:02 PM »

Awesome list guys!

One thing I always wear are my shirt stays. It's a habit from the Marines. Of course I have had my trousers and shirts tailored first, and then I still use the stays because it keeps the shirt pulled taught. Looks better than when it starts backing out of your belt line because you get up and down or bend over and stand back up. I think this is more the extra mile though than what I think most people would do.
Logged
NorCal21
Forum Regular

Posts: 168

« Reply #32 on: May 23, 2015, 06:03:16 PM »

When blousing your trousers, blouse them from the inside. This keeps the trousers from riding up or becoming unbloused.

1. Put on trousers
2. put on boots
3. Lower the trousers, create an inside cuff and wrap the blousing band* around your cuff and boot.
4. Raise trousers, buckle belt.
 The trousers will be taut when pulled up.

*Use the Velcro 1 inch blousing bands.

You know, I do it the way I was taught in the Marines. Has served me well so far.

Wrap the laces around the top of your boot and then tie the bow. Place the blousing band between 2nd and 3rd eyelets. Don't pull your trousers all the way yet where they would normally sit on your waist. Blouse the trouser legs. Pull up trousers and button them. This gets you a tight blouse and one that is neat versus having a bunch of material hanging down and over the blousing point. Of course you're going to get some material hanging down as you work throughout the day.
Logged
HGjunkie
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,610

« Reply #33 on: May 24, 2015, 02:14:08 AM »

When blousing your trousers, blouse them from the inside. This keeps the trousers from riding up or becoming unbloused.

1. Put on trousers
2. put on boots
3. Lower the trousers, create an inside cuff and wrap the blousing band* around your cuff and boot.
4. Raise trousers, buckle belt.
 The trousers will be taut when pulled up.

*Use the Velcro 1 inch blousing bands.

You know, I do it the way I was taught in the Marines. Has served me well so far.

Wrap the laces around the top of your boot and then tie the bow. Place the blousing band between 2nd and 3rd eyelets. Don't pull your trousers all the way yet where they would normally sit on your waist. Blouse the trouser legs. Pull up trousers and button them. This gets you a tight blouse and one that is neat versus having a bunch of material hanging down and over the blousing point. Of course you're going to get some material hanging down as you work throughout the day.
Won't that mean the pants are draped down on the top portion of the boot though?
Logged
•••
C2C USAFA
Alaric
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 704

« Reply #34 on: May 24, 2015, 02:25:08 AM »

I like to look good in what I'm wearing as much as the next guy, but if we spent half the time we spend jawjacking about uniforms on our actual missions, we would be a force to be reckoned with.
Logged
Storm Chaser
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,657

« Reply #35 on: May 24, 2015, 09:45:57 AM »

I like to look good in what I'm wearing as much as the next guy, but if we spent half the time we spend jawjacking about uniforms on our actual missions, we would be a force to be reckoned with.

That is so true.

Our uniforms should look good. But if you're spending more time on your uniform than on the mission, you're doing it wrong.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2015, 09:52:26 AM by Storm Chaser » Logged
NIN
VIP

Posts: 4,446
Unit: of issue

« Reply #36 on: May 24, 2015, 11:29:49 AM »

I snagged on of these measuring devices last year:


It works a treat for quickly and easily doing shoulder-sleeve insignia and collar insignia.
Logged
Darin Ninness, Lt Col, CAP
Sq Bubba, Wing Dude, National Guy
I like to have Difficult Adult Conversations™
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2017 by NIN. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.
MIKE
Super Moderator

Posts: 5,466
Unit: LANTAREA

« Reply #37 on: May 24, 2015, 05:11:13 PM »

I snagged on of these measuring devices last year:


It works a treat for quickly and easily doing shoulder-sleeve insignia and collar insignia.

I use one of these: http://www.rangerjoes.com/Ruler-Uniform-P727.aspx


Comes in really handy for ribbons and nametags... especially when they need to be spaced 1/4" above the pocket... Unlike CAP.
Logged
Mike Johnston
Protohuman
Recruit

Posts: 5
Unit: MER-VA-117

« Reply #38 on: December 17, 2015, 04:53:14 PM »

HERE IS A CHRISTMAS DISCOUNT CODE FOR VANGUARD  IT IS FOR 15% OFF AND[ FREE SHIPPING ON ORDERS OVER $25.  IF THE WEBSITE WON'T TAKE THE CODE CALL THEM AND ASK FOR A SUPERVISOR OR EMAIL CUSTOMER SERVICE  http://www.goodsearch.com/vanguard-industries/coupons?open=11813915#filter-promo-code
Logged
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,637

« Reply #39 on: December 17, 2015, 11:44:48 PM »

HERE IS A CHRISTMAS DISCOUNT CODE FOR VANGUARD  IT IS FOR 15% OFF AND[ FREE SHIPPING ON ORDERS OVER $25.  IF THE WEBSITE WON'T TAKE THE CODE CALL THEM AND ASK FOR A SUPERVISOR OR EMAIL CUSTOMER SERVICE  http://www.goodsearch.com/vanguard-industries/coupons?open=11813915#filter-promo-code


WHY ARE YOU YELLING?????????     All CAPS is considered yelling on the Internet. And the Vanguard monthly discount is not worth yelling about.
Logged
Chappie
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,032

« Reply #40 on: December 18, 2015, 01:34:00 PM »

Phil....don't be such a Scrooge.  ;)   Can't you see that the poster is a newbie and is excited about Vanguard's Christmas Discount????  Oh the joy of the making a Vanguard purchase and the surprise you get when you open the package  ::)
Logged
Disclaimer:  Not to be confused with the other user that goes by "Chappy"   :)
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,637

« Reply #41 on: December 18, 2015, 09:30:10 PM »

Phil....don't be such a Scrooge.  ;)   Can't you see that the poster is a newbie and is excited about Vanguard's Christmas Discount????  Oh the joy of the making a Vanguard purchase and the surprise you get when you open the package  ::)

If you get the package... ;)
Logged
Protohuman
Recruit

Posts: 5
Unit: MER-VA-117

« Reply #42 on: December 24, 2015, 06:32:06 PM »

Phil..Sorry I upset you.  I did not know that " all caps" meant anything. The computer just happened to be set with caps locked on.  I did not even notice that until I cut and pasted the URL for the discount.  With the high cost of Vanguard and their supply lock on many CAP items I was just trying to pass on a little discount.  Some families have several CAP members and Vanguard items and shipping seam quite expensive compared to other sources. Unfortunately there are several uniform items we can only order from Vanguard. Merry Christmas.
Logged
William K. Bolan
Recruit

Posts: 33
Unit: MER-VA-064

« Reply #43 on: February 11, 2016, 09:43:50 AM »

So on my BDU, am I required to have the American flag on the side or not? I am hearing no from some, and yes from others
Logged
Garibaldi
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,327
Unit: SER-GA-045

Sandy Springs Cadet Squadron
« Reply #44 on: February 11, 2016, 10:06:16 AM »

So on my BDU, am I required to have the American flag on the side or not? I am hearing no from some, and yes from others

The mandatory non-wear date is next year, to have it off the uniform. Some units are not making new members put it on, but not making current members take it off until 2017. I'd ask your commander.
Logged
You can't take the sky from me. Also, I can kill you with my brain. No power in the 'verse can stop me.
Chappie
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,032

« Reply #45 on: February 11, 2016, 12:37:45 PM »

So on my BDU, am I required to have the American flag on the side or not? I am hearing no from some, and yes from others

The mandatory non-wear date is next year, to have it off the uniform. Some units are not making new members put it on, but not making current members take it off until 2017. I'd ask your commander.

^^Good advise regarding to see how the local unit is handling this.   On a personal note, the flag is no longer on my BDUs and hasn't been since the current uniform manual was released.   And no...this is not an open invite to regurgitate that whole flag on/off debate.
 
Logged
Disclaimer:  Not to be confused with the other user that goes by "Chappy"   :)
Jester
Forum Regular

Posts: 127

« Reply #46 on: March 21, 2016, 05:57:58 PM »

Problem:  I've always had a hard time with shirt stays remaining connected on the shirttail. After recently joining CAP a few years removed from AD I encountered this again.

My initial idea was to have buttonholes sewn into the shirttail so the shirt stay would have something good to hold onto. This may still work but I don't have the skill or equipment to do it and my local alterations doesn't either.

Solution:  what I can do, however, is sew on a button. I saw this on a cop forum and smacked my forehead that I hadn't thought of it before.

I went to Walmart, got a pack of assorted buttons and needles for $1 each. Then I got some heavy duty upholstery thread for a similar amount.  I picked 4 buttons that would fit through the metal part of the connector but would also securely hold it.

Then I sewed each button on using the directions here: http://www.artofmanliness.com/2012/06/28/sewing-on-a-button/

This allows a shank to account for the spacing needed to hang the metal loop on the button.

Time will tell how this works long term, but I dig it thus far.
Logged
lordmonar
Too Much Free Time Award
***
Posts: 10,556

« Reply #47 on: March 21, 2016, 06:04:32 PM »

Try maybe going to locals Jo Anns or other local sewing/fabric store.

"Hey I need two button holes on my shirt.  I don't want to spend $200+ on a sewing machine. Can you help?"

They may be able to do it for you...or suggest someone who does home tailoring/sewing/seam-stressing that can do it for you cheap.
Logged
PATRICK M. HARRIS, SMSgt, CAP
Pacific Region
Jester
Forum Regular

Posts: 127

« Reply #48 on: March 21, 2016, 06:17:26 PM »

It would be lower profile but I wonder how much the pull of the shirt stay will cause the inside of a button hole to tear.

I have like 4 other shirts that still have stripes on them that I'll take a swing at having buttonholed for later, so we shall see.
Logged
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award
***
Posts: 27,350

« Reply #49 on: March 21, 2016, 06:26:17 PM »

! No longer available
Logged

"Effort" does not equal "results".
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2017 by eclipse. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

lordmonar
Too Much Free Time Award
***
Posts: 10,556

« Reply #50 on: March 21, 2016, 06:26:59 PM »

I don't know....I've never had the problem of my shirt stays coming off.

My first guess would be that you are pulling too tight.  They are not there to really keep the shirts super tight.

You might also want to try using more of them.   Spread the load around.

Logged
PATRICK M. HARRIS, SMSgt, CAP
Pacific Region
Jester
Forum Regular

Posts: 127

« Reply #51 on: March 21, 2016, 06:37:06 PM »

No clue. At one time I wore 6 total but as I've become less hooah with age I've mellowed to just 4.
Logged
Майор Хаткевич
200,000th Post Author
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,979
Unit: GLR-IL-049

« Reply #52 on: March 21, 2016, 07:58:05 PM »

No clue. At one time I wore 6 total but as I've become less hooah with age I've mellowed to just 4.

Yea, went from 8, to 6, to 4 now. Does the gut count as #5?
Logged
Shieldel
Member

Posts: 67
Unit: PCR-NV-802

« Reply #53 on: March 22, 2016, 12:49:54 AM »

I myself as a cadet, don't worry about shirt stays as normally when on Nellis for blues night meetings I'm in class a's with my service coat anyways. When at an event or when it's determined officers do not wear their coat at NCS Meetings, I wear a ShirtLock. I swear by the thing and it has made life so much easier. I don't wear shirt stays. I've seen far too many "incidents" with my male LVMPD Police Explorers when wearing shirt stays. lol.
Logged
Flight Officer Michael D. Scheidle
Jack Schofield Cadet Squadron
ES Officer
ES Training Officer
FEMA Corps Class 23 Alumni - FEMA-4277-DR-LA Deployment to Baton Rouge FEMA JFO August - October 2016
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award
***
Posts: 27,350

« Reply #54 on: March 22, 2016, 01:00:12 AM »

http://captalk.net/index.php?topic=325.msg4908#msg4908

and

http://captalk.net/index.php?topic=325.msg75617#msg75617
Logged

"Effort" does not equal "results".
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2017 by eclipse. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

Shieldel
Member

Posts: 67
Unit: PCR-NV-802

« Reply #55 on: March 22, 2016, 04:06:34 AM »

http://captalk.net/index.php?topic=325.msg4908#msg4908

and

http://captalk.net/index.php?topic=325.msg75617#msg75617

That gave me a good giggle, much appreciated sir, I'm going through personal issues so that was a well needed laugh.
Logged
Flight Officer Michael D. Scheidle
Jack Schofield Cadet Squadron
ES Officer
ES Training Officer
FEMA Corps Class 23 Alumni - FEMA-4277-DR-LA Deployment to Baton Rouge FEMA JFO August - October 2016
Майор Хаткевич
200,000th Post Author
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 5,979
Unit: GLR-IL-049

« Reply #56 on: March 22, 2016, 11:21:40 AM »

http://captalk.net/index.php?topic=325.msg4908#msg4908

and

http://captalk.net/index.php?topic=325.msg75617#msg75617


That 2005 story is ALWAYS a pleasure to read. I think I've seen it linked, and read it fully at least 4-5 times.
Logged
AlphaSigOU
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,125
Unit: SER-AL-001

The Kwaj Drafter!
« Reply #57 on: March 22, 2016, 03:42:11 PM »

Shirt garter emasculation... you only hafta experience it once. Once. :)
Logged
Lt Col Charles E. (Chuck) Corway, CAP
Gill Robb Wilson Award (#2901 - 2011)
Amelia Earhart Award (#1257 - 1982) - C/Major (retired)
Billy Mitchell Award (#2375 - 1981)
One of three of CAP's active senior members on Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands!
(Don't ask me about forming an overseas squadron here... ain't gonna happen!)
KJ6GHO - NAR 45040
spatch
Newbie

Posts: 2
Unit: WI-153

« Reply #58 on: April 13, 2016, 11:04:50 AM »

I am a returning member after a 5 year hiatus and am preparing my mess dress for our Wing Conference.  In doing so, I noticed that my metal CAP seal has become tarnished.  Any tips on how to safely clean it? (I realize now that I should've kept it in a ziplock bag.  Didn't think of it or care when I left CAP years ago, so please don't even bring that up.  :-X)
Logged
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award
***
Posts: 27,350

« Reply #59 on: April 13, 2016, 11:22:56 AM »

It's probably not tarnished, the epoxy coating has probably yellowed, depends on the vintage.

Best bet is to just get a new one.
Logged

"Effort" does not equal "results".
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2017 by eclipse. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

spatch
Newbie

Posts: 2
Unit: WI-153

« Reply #60 on: April 13, 2016, 11:34:30 AM »

Yes, what was once white is now yellow.  Don't have time to buy a new one as I need to be ready by Friday evening.  Bought the original 8 years ago, if that helps.  Even if I didn't need it so soon, I'd prefer to try to clean/restore it before buying a new one.
Logged
Al Sayre
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,499
Unit: SER-MS-001

Mississippi Wing
« Reply #61 on: April 13, 2016, 11:42:38 AM »

You could try something like those kits they sell to clean up faded/fogged headlights... Beyond that replacing it is the only sure fix I know of.
Logged
Lt Col Al Sayre
MS Wing Staff Dude
Admiral, Great Navy of the State of Nebraska
GRW #2787
Hummingbird
Member

Posts: 58
Unit: NER-NY-390

« Reply #62 on: May 03, 2016, 01:54:33 PM »

Quick tip for loosely aligning insignia without tools and in a hurry:

Fold the shirt/blouse backwards (along the "spine", to give a reference) and line each half of the collar up with the other. Then make sure that it's a mirror image. Did this to help someone fix their stuff in a hurry before a uniform inspection. Even if it's not quite the right distance from each edge it'll look a bit better.
Logged
C/SSgtHummingbird CAP
(Almost) low man on the totem pole
NER-NY-390 (Vanguard)
TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 832

« Reply #63 on: May 03, 2016, 01:57:38 PM »

I finally came to the point where I had to refer to this post to find the thread # for the patches.

You should have seen me standing in the store aisle trying to figure out which threads were blue and which were purple (color deficient)  :-\
Logged
JC004
[Insert Cool Title Here]
Global Moderator

Posts: 4,515

« Reply #64 on: June 20, 2016, 12:23:52 PM »

I finally came to the point where I had to refer to this post to find the thread # for the patches.

You should have seen me standing in the store aisle trying to figure out which threads were blue and which were purple (color deficient)  :-\

I may have to change the colors.  We'll see.  Might just be #4900 (Navy).
Logged
TheSkyHornet
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 832

« Reply #65 on: June 20, 2016, 03:55:47 PM »

I finally came to the point where I had to refer to this post to find the thread # for the patches.

You should have seen me standing in the store aisle trying to figure out which threads were blue and which were purple (color deficient)  :-\

I may have to change the colors.  We'll see.  Might just be #4900 (Navy).

Great. Another excursion around Jo-Ann Fabric like a lost little lamb
Logged
JC004
[Insert Cool Title Here]
Global Moderator

Posts: 4,515

« Reply #66 on: June 25, 2016, 04:24:25 AM »

I finally came to the point where I had to refer to this post to find the thread # for the patches.

You should have seen me standing in the store aisle trying to figure out which threads were blue and which were purple (color deficient)  :-\

I may have to change the colors.  We'll see.  Might just be #4900 (Navy).

Great. Another excursion around Jo-Ann Fabric like a lost little lamb

If it's #4900, that's available pretty much everywhere. 
Logged
MSG Mac
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,721
Unit: MER-MD-071

« Reply #67 on: June 25, 2016, 04:37:04 PM »

When cleaning Corfam/Poremic shoes use a soft dry cloth and nonabrasive soap. dish soap or shaving cream works wonders
Logged
Michael P. McEleney
Lt Col CAP
MSG USA (Retired)
SarDragon
Global Moderator

Posts: 9,787
Unit: NAVAIRPAC

« Reply #68 on: June 26, 2016, 04:01:45 AM »

Windex worked well for me, followed by a wipe with a cloth having a light spritz of Pledge. Light spritz, barely wetting the cloth.
Logged
Dave Bowles
Maj, CAP
AT1, USN Retired
Mitchell Award (unnumbered)
C/WO, CAP, Ret
JC004
[Insert Cool Title Here]
Global Moderator

Posts: 4,515

« Reply #69 on: October 21, 2016, 05:15:17 PM »

I'd like to resume working on this project of compiling uniform tips into a guide, now that I am getting caught up on a number of post-hospital projects. 

I'd like to have a printable version (that individual members can print, or you can distribute during classes) and a web version to which you can easily point your members.
Logged
docrameous
Recruit

Posts: 21

« Reply #70 on: January 01, 2017, 06:27:22 PM »

Posted from another thread... if you take your ABU/BDU to a tailor and you are not certain they understand the regs for putting on your occupational badges, show them this graphic (in addition to the relevant text out of 39-1)

Logged
oweng_01
Guest
« Reply #71 on: March 05, 2017, 06:49:03 PM »

dose anyone know if your allowed to military press your AF blues uniform? Over all good article.
Logged
Jester
Forum Regular

Posts: 127

« Reply #72 on: March 05, 2017, 07:15:14 PM »

dose anyone know if your allowed to military press your AF blues uniform? Over all good article.


If you mean "military creases" with 2 running down the front and 3 running down the back, then no.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 4 [All] Print 
CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Uniforms & Awards  |  Topic: Uniform Tips
 


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.13 | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.461 seconds with 20 queries.