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Author Topic: Memories - IN PROCESSING - the very beginning of enc  (Read 16421 times)
Pulsar
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Posts: 196
Unit: NER-PA----

« on: October 13, 2013, 04:43:14 PM »

I would like to read other cadets' or former cadets experiences at in processing (training Day 00) at their Encampment.

My memory:

It was a bright, mostly sunny day when 2 other male cadets and I arrived at Fort Indiantown Gap, pa; [ JUN 22/2013; 1100L time] we were the first sign in's. We shuffled nervously about checking our gear in and getting our CAPIDs scanned. Everyone greeted us cordially, "Welcome to Encampment." Everything was fine; everything perfect...or so we thought......            Encampment really began in the vans on the way to our barracks. My friends and I were talking and joking when the van stopped...We hadn't even noticed when we heard: "[BANG!!--BANG-BANG!!!] -the van door is torn open.- a female officer stands yelling: "WHAT ARE YOU DOING?!!-SITTING WASTING TIME?!!-OUT!!OUT!! GET OUT OF THIS VAN!!!!...ARE YOU GONNA THANK THE DRIVER!?!-HUGH-HUGH?!! ARE YOU THAT DISRESCECTFUL?!!!"  Everything happened so fast; this and that- on and on- everything was chaos for us cadets.  A few seconds later, I found myself standing near a wall at attention. All one could hear was staff yelling and screaming at cadets. I was alone...utterly ALONE ( I was the first female cadet there; I was in Sqd. 30 which is an all- female sqd.)

For what seemed like hours I was tested on the cadet oath, honor code, core values, and countless other things. Every little mistake I made was yelled in my face. Finally, other females arrive. After running to get our gear from the trucks, we are formed in a line in front of the barracks door. We are told to report to the officer upstairs. The first cadet tries. She is screamed at for not greeting nearby officers hiding behind the door. On and on- every cadet failed at something. Finally it gets to me; I greet correctly, do everything satisfactory, go upstairs, and report correctly. -I even write my information. But I hear: "IS THIS WHERE I PUT MY PEN?!!!" I try to answer but instead he says: "WRONG!!! END OF THE LINE!" So much for signing in. Anyway, after all the cadets finally satisfactorily sign in, we are escorted into the barracks. I was told to find a rack and open or dump out all me stuff onto it. A nice SM begins to inspect my gear. "finally-a nice person", I think. After that is over I am given sheets and told to choose another rack and make it. As I walk by, other shaky and nervous cadets greet me (thinking me a staff member). I say, "Hey guys, chill out. I'm a student here too. Be careful who you greet! You will get in trouble." (I was a C/SMSgt)  I continue to my rack. The longest day of my life continues......



Ok, that was my experience. Many girls and... boys cried that first day. Encampment is so different from everyday life. (for me anyways).
Also, when you post, I would like true experiences. Thank you. I love hearing about different wings encampments.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2013, 11:10:28 AM by MIKE » Logged
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PAWG ENC 2013/ AMMA 2014/ NER W RCLS 2014-5 [Salutatorian] / NER Powered Flight Academy 2015

ďA fiery strength inspires their lives, An essence that from heaven
derives,..." - Vergil, The Aeneid

(C) Copyright 2013: Readers who choose to hardcopy my comments are entitled to specific rights, namely: you may print them off and read them repeatedly until you have memorized them and then rattle them off as if you had thought them up yourself; However if asked, you must say they were signaled to you from a neutron star.
Майор Хаткевич
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« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2013, 05:13:43 PM »

Wow...
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Eclipse
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« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2013, 06:13:11 PM »

Double wow. 
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Fubar
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Posts: 597

« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2013, 12:38:08 AM »

Certainly explains why HQ is developing a new curriculum that doesn't give wings a lot of leeway for "local customs" such as these.
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Luis R. Ramos
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Posts: 2,454

« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2013, 12:48:55 AM »

And this happened in 2013?

Retrograde. I thought you were describing an Encampment from 1960.

Flyer
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raivo
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« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2013, 02:40:14 AM »

Infinite-wow.
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1Lt, CAP
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Elioron
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« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2013, 03:23:25 AM »

With a few exceptions, this is similar to what I've seen in my limited experience staffing encampments.  That being said, looking only at Day 00 is incredibly myopic.  It's like looking at only the start of a race and getting upset that there was a gunshot and yelling (someone because someone yelled "GO!!").

Minor Exception: Our in-processing is at a intensity level of about 3-4 (1 being asleep and 10 being extremely stressed).  Cadets sign in, go to their barracks, meet their TAC Officer for bag check, and are told to sit in the shade along the outside wall and read their SOPs.

Major Exceptions: Cadets are never set up to fail.  There is no reason to manufacture failure - they will make more than enough mistakes to teach and being set up teaches nothing.  There is no yelling in people's faces, but once the Big Bang begins, there is yelling.  Intensity is at 9.

Big Bang is meant to be an emotional shock.  Failure is called out loudly, but not to the individual.  The entire flight is admonished - fail as a flight, succeed as a flight.  Almost every cadet wonders what they signed up for and tears are not uncommon, but not the majority by far.  Most of the tears are generally caused by homesickness or lack of readiness (never having spent the night away from home before, for instance, is not uncommon).  Careful control through the TAC Officers and experienced staff continually monitor the line staff to ensure that they don't go overboard.  Staff Training itself is several days at the facility beforehand, and much of it deals with how to instill intensity safely.

The curriculum scales back intensity continually throughout the week until it gets back to 5-6 by Friday (similar to a typical class in a school).
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ol'fido
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Posts: 1,877
Unit: DOTCOTE.

« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2013, 10:23:01 AM »

I would like to read other cadets' or former cadets experiences at in processing (training Day 00) at their Encampment.

My memory:

It was a bright, mostly sunny day when 2 other male cadets and I arrived at Fort Indiantown Gap, pa; [ JUN 22/2013; 1100L time] we were the first sign in's. We shuffled nervously about checking our gear in and getting our CAPIDs scanned. Everyone greeted us cordially, "Welcome to Encampment." Everything was fine; everything perfect...or so we thought......            Encampment really began in the vans on the way to our barracks. My friends and I were talking and joking when the van stopped...We hadn't even noticed when we heard: "[BANG!!--BANG-BANG!!!] -the van door is torn open.- a female officer stands yelling: "WHAT ARE YOU DOING?!!-SITTING WASTING TIME?!!-OUT!!OUT!! GET OUT OF THIS VAN!!!!...ARE YOU GONNA THANK THE DRIVER!?!-HUGH-HUGH?!! ARE YOU THAT DISRESCECTFUL?!!!"  Everything happened so fast; this and that- on and on- everything was chaos for us cadets.  A few seconds later, I found myself standing near a wall at attention. All one could hear was staff yelling and screaming at cadets. I was alone...utterly ALONE ( I was the first female cadet there; I was in Sqd. 30 which is an all- female sqd.)

For what seemed like hours I was tested on the cadet oath, honor code, core values, and countless other things. Every little mistake I made was yelled in my face. Finally, other females arrive. After running to get our gear from the trucks, we are formed in a line in front of the barracks door. We are told to report to the officer upstairs. The first cadet tries. She is screamed at for not greeting nearby officers hiding behind the door. On and on- every cadet failed at something. Finally it gets to me; I greet correctly, do everything satisfactory, go upstairs, and report correctly. -I even write my information. But I hear: "IS THIS WHERE I PUT MY PEN?!!!" I try to answer but instead he says: "WRONG!!! END OF THE LINE!" So much for signing in. Anyway, after all the cadets finally satisfactorily sign in, we are escorted into the barracks. I was told to find a rack and open or dump out all me stuff onto it. A nice SM begins to inspect my gear. "finally-a nice person", I think. After that is over I am given sheets and told to choose another rack and make it. As I walk by, other shaky and nervous cadets greet me (thinking me a staff member). I say, "Hey guys, chill out. I'm a student here too. Be careful who you greet! You will get in trouble." (I was a C/SMSgt)  I continue to my rack. The longest day of my life continues......



Ok, that was my experience. Many girls and... boys cried that first day. Encampment is so different from everyday life. (for me anyways).
Also, when you post, I would like true experiences. Thank you. I love hearing about different wings encampments.
Just what we have been trying for years to eliminate.
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Lt. Col. Randy L. Mitchell
Historian, Group 1, IL-006
Майор Хаткевич
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« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2013, 10:32:21 AM »

No kidding. You would think with the draft guide out they would at least check how they measure up to it...
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Eclipse
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« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2013, 10:50:28 AM »

What this organization needs are the equivalent of UN inspectors to visit every encampment and similar activity to make sure things are done properly.
This was supposed to be CAP-USAF's role to a certain extent, but we all know that many encampments were never given more then cursory attention,
and now with the recent reductions in RAPs and SDs (from about 50% manning before), they no longer have the ability for any real impact, not to mention
that the encampment approval is now up to the Wing CC instead of the SD.

Another area where baseline expectations get "adjusted" by local commanders and staff.

Why is it people never fudge the line in the right direction?  And in the last year or so, it's almost as if some activities are trying to
"get one more in before the new rules...".

Here's an idea - take the effort and expense wasted on SUIs and CIs and focus it on mission-centric activities that actually have an impact
on the member experience.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2013, 10:59:38 AM by Eclipse » Logged

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The contents of this post are Copyright © 2017 by eclipse. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

ol'fido
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,877
Unit: DOTCOTE.

« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2013, 11:01:30 AM »

98% of the new curriculum we do already. The other two percent is schedule adjustment. It's not hard. We try to find the middle ground between the "boot camp, semper psycho" mentality and the "let's all hold hands and sing Kumbaya" thing. Like I said, it's not difficult. Set standards. Enforce the standards. Do so in a professional manner. Don't go overboard.
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Lt. Col. Randy L. Mitchell
Historian, Group 1, IL-006
Luis R. Ramos
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 2,454

« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2013, 11:12:01 AM »

Oh my God!

You should NOT have mentioned Kumbaya!

Now I cannot take the image off my mind of Eclipse, USAFAux, SARMed and Lord all singing Kumbaya on Blues at the top of a hill...

Flyer

 
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lordmonar
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« Reply #12 on: October 14, 2013, 11:22:11 AM »

What this organization needs are the equivalent of UN inspectors to visit every encampment and similar activity to make sure things are done properly.
This was supposed to be CAP-USAF's role to a certain extent, but we all know that many encampments were never given more then cursory attention,
and now with the recent reductions in RAPs and SDs (from about 50% manning before), they no longer have the ability for any real impact, not to mention
that the encampment approval is now up to the Wing CC instead of the SD.

Another area where baseline expectations get "adjusted" by local commanders and staff.

Why is it people never fudge the line in the right direction?  And in the last year or so, it's almost as if some activities are trying to
"get one more in before the new rules...".

Here's an idea - take the effort and expense wasted on SUIs and CIs and focus it on mission-centric activities that actually have an impact
on the member experience.
+1

We need to have a "National Camp School" (to steal from the BSA again) where each wing must send a few members to each year.   This is where they learn the standards and help set the base line.

We also need NHQ to send an inspector to each encampment (at least for 1 day) to see what's going on and help curb this sort of thing.

Also.....instead of wing level encampments......what about regional level encampments that run 4-5 sessions per summer?

Easier to control content of only 8+/- programs instead of 50+/- programs.
Cheaper in the we are not re-inventing the wheel at 50 +/- locations.
Transportation may be an issue.....but if you can travel all the way across TX or CA to get to an encampment.....going to the regional facility is not going to be a deal breaker.

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PATRICK M. HARRIS, SMSgt, CAP
Pacific Region
Pulsar
Forum Regular

Posts: 196
Unit: NER-PA----

« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2013, 12:08:17 PM »

No kidding. You would think with the draft guide out they would at least check how they measure up to it...
oh don't worry. They do. We had a visit from the vice national commander. There was no hazing; after other cadets arrived, they generally yelled at you as a group; not an individual. and throughout the week it (of course) got less and less intense until we hit graduation (none at all). I did things at encampment I still don't think I can do. People talk about learning from their mistakes. -I learned faster that first day than any other day in my life. It was so worth it and I am so thankful to my staff for how much they put into teaching us. It was awesome now that I think back to it. We had to earn jodies and our guidon like any other squadron. Now I know my staff personally. There're really nice and we never would of got honor squadron of the week without them. My fellow cadets and I also became the best of friends; We really are a team.

Anyway, back to the draft thing. I am sad about them taking fire watch away. There was a SM making rounds as well, but the best times happened on fire watch.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2013, 12:16:01 PM by Pulsar » Logged
C/LtCol Neutron Star
PAWG ENC 2013/ AMMA 2014/ NER W RCLS 2014-5 [Salutatorian] / NER Powered Flight Academy 2015

ďA fiery strength inspires their lives, An essence that from heaven
derives,..." - Vergil, The Aeneid

(C) Copyright 2013: Readers who choose to hardcopy my comments are entitled to specific rights, namely: you may print them off and read them repeatedly until you have memorized them and then rattle them off as if you had thought them up yourself; However if asked, you must say they were signaled to you from a neutron star.
Pulsar
Forum Regular

Posts: 196
Unit: NER-PA----

« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2013, 12:29:19 PM »

With a few exceptions, this is similar to what I've seen in my limited experience staffing encampments.  That being said, looking only at Day 00 is incredibly myopic.  It's like looking at only the start of a race and getting upset that there was a gunshot and yelling (someone because someone yelled "GO!!").

Minor Exception: Our in-processing is at a intensity level of about 3-4 (1 being asleep and 10 being extremely stressed).  Cadets sign in, go to their barracks, meet their TAC Officer for bag check, and are told to sit in the shade along the outside wall and read their SOPs.

Major Exceptions: Cadets are never set up to fail.  There is no reason to manufacture failure - they will make more than enough mistakes to teach and being set up teaches nothing.  There is no yelling in people's faces, but once the Big Bang begins, there is yelling.  Intensity is at 9.

Big Bang is meant to be an emotional shock.  Failure is called out loudly, but not to the individual.  The entire flight is admonished - fail as a flight, succeed as a flight.  Almost every cadet wonders what they signed up for and tears are not uncommon, but not the majority by far.  Most of the tears are generally caused by homesickness or lack of readiness (never having spent the night away from home before, for instance, is not uncommon).  Careful control through the TAC Officers and experienced staff continually monitor the line staff to ensure that they don't go overboard.  Staff Training itself is several days at the facility beforehand, and much of it deals with how to instill intensity safely.

The curriculum scales back intensity continually throughout the week until it gets back to 5-6 by Friday (similart to a typical class in a school).

The TAC officers did supervise and observe. The yelling was a few instances in peoples faces (more so at the beginning. Like with my experience. ). After other cadets arrive it is more as a group. They would only single you out if they really needed to and repeatedly made the same mistake. I was a proud peacock so I needed it. They expected more of me because I was a C/SMSgt.
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C/LtCol Neutron Star
PAWG ENC 2013/ AMMA 2014/ NER W RCLS 2014-5 [Salutatorian] / NER Powered Flight Academy 2015

ďA fiery strength inspires their lives, An essence that from heaven
derives,..." - Vergil, The Aeneid

(C) Copyright 2013: Readers who choose to hardcopy my comments are entitled to specific rights, namely: you may print them off and read them repeatedly until you have memorized them and then rattle them off as if you had thought them up yourself; However if asked, you must say they were signaled to you from a neutron star.
ol'fido
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,877
Unit: DOTCOTE.

« Reply #15 on: October 14, 2013, 01:01:14 PM »

With a few exceptions, this is similar to what I've seen in my limited experience staffing encampments.  That being said, looking only at Day 00 is incredibly myopic.  It's like looking at only the start of a race and getting upset that there was a gunshot and yelling (someone because someone yelled "GO!!").

Minor Exception: Our in-processing is at a intensity level of about 3-4 (1 being asleep and 10 being extremely stressed).  Cadets sign in, go to their barracks, meet their TAC Officer for bag check, and are told to sit in the shade along the outside wall and read their SOPs.

Major Exceptions: Cadets are never set up to fail.  There is no reason to manufacture failure - they will make more than enough mistakes to teach and being set up teaches nothing.  There is no yelling in people's faces, but once the Big Bang begins, there is yelling.  Intensity is at 9.

Big Bang is meant to be an emotional shock.  Failure is called out loudly, but not to the individual.  The entire flight is admonished - fail as a flight, succeed as a flight.  Almost every cadet wonders what they signed up for and tears are not uncommon, but not the majority by far.  Most of the tears are generally caused by homesickness or lack of readiness (never having spent the night away from home before, for instance, is not uncommon).  Careful control through the TAC Officers and experienced staff continually monitor the line staff to ensure that they don't go overboard.  Staff Training itself is several days at the facility beforehand, and much of it deals with how to instill intensity safely.

The curriculum scales back intensity continually throughout the week until it gets back to 5-6 by Friday (similart to a typical class in a school).

The TAC officers did supervise and observe. The yelling was a few instances in peoples faces (more so at the beginning. Like with my experience. ). After other cadets arrive it is more as a group. They would only single you out if they really needed to and repeatedly made the same mistake. I was a proud peacock so I needed it. They expected more of me because I was a C/SMSgt.
I'm sorry but this is not the way it should be. This reminds me of the stories I hear about abused wives saying "If I was a better wife, he wouldn't need to hit me." I'm not saying this is anywhere near that level of wrong, but this is the same psychology.
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Lt. Col. Randy L. Mitchell
Historian, Group 1, IL-006
Pulsar
Forum Regular

Posts: 196
Unit: NER-PA----

« Reply #16 on: October 14, 2013, 01:10:34 PM »

maybe I shouldn't of posted this.  :-[  :-X  ;D
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C/LtCol Neutron Star
PAWG ENC 2013/ AMMA 2014/ NER W RCLS 2014-5 [Salutatorian] / NER Powered Flight Academy 2015

ďA fiery strength inspires their lives, An essence that from heaven
derives,..." - Vergil, The Aeneid

(C) Copyright 2013: Readers who choose to hardcopy my comments are entitled to specific rights, namely: you may print them off and read them repeatedly until you have memorized them and then rattle them off as if you had thought them up yourself; However if asked, you must say they were signaled to you from a neutron star.
Майор Хаткевич
200,000th Post Author
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,020
Unit: GLR-IL-049

« Reply #17 on: October 14, 2013, 01:14:59 PM »

Well, it's out there already. People in high places have seen it now as well. Probably little will be done, but I'm sure there just may (I hope) be a bit more oversight when the new curriculum becomes the law of the land.
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Pulsar
Forum Regular

Posts: 196
Unit: NER-PA----

« Reply #18 on: October 14, 2013, 01:27:37 PM »

Well, it's out there already. People in high places have seen it now as well. Probably little will be done, but I'm sure there just may (I hope) be a bit more oversight when the new curriculum becomes the law of the land.
heh-heh
...yeah  :-[
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C/LtCol Neutron Star
PAWG ENC 2013/ AMMA 2014/ NER W RCLS 2014-5 [Salutatorian] / NER Powered Flight Academy 2015

ďA fiery strength inspires their lives, An essence that from heaven
derives,..." - Vergil, The Aeneid

(C) Copyright 2013: Readers who choose to hardcopy my comments are entitled to specific rights, namely: you may print them off and read them repeatedly until you have memorized them and then rattle them off as if you had thought them up yourself; However if asked, you must say they were signaled to you from a neutron star.
Elioron
Forum Regular

Posts: 123
Unit: PCR-WA-019

« Reply #19 on: October 14, 2013, 01:37:42 PM »

This reminds me of the stories I hear about abused wives saying "If I was a better wife, he wouldn't need to hit me." I'm not saying this is anywhere near that level of wrong, but this is the same psychology.

That's a pretty huge stretch, there.  That's like saying that yelling at your child is the same as beating them with a stick.  Any parent that says they haven't yelled at their kids is either a liar or has kids that behave horribly.

As a CAP officer and a parent, I can say that I was quite satisfied with the process as both of my sons went through it.  Yelling != "boot camp, semper psycho"
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Scott W. Dean, Capt, CAP
CDS/DOS/ITO/Comm/LGT/Admin - CP
PCR-WA-019
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CAP Talk  |  Operations  |  Tall Tales  |  Topic: Memories - IN PROCESSING - the very beginning of enc
 


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