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October 17, 2017, 12:11:21 AM
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CAP Talk  |  Recent Posts
CAP Talk  |  Recent Posts
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 21 
 on: Yesterday at 09:29:25 AM 
Started by FW - Last post by Cicero
To ponder in the absence of news: https://www.thecollegefix.com/post/37909/

 22 
 on: Yesterday at 09:03:03 AM 
Started by xray328 - Last post by xray328
Glider Program Procedures:

"Glider academy students are restricted from completing solo the first time they attend,
whether it is nationally accredited or not. Waivers may be requested with the
concurrence of two flight instructors through the NHQ/DO; however, blanket waivers
cannot be approved"

 23 
 on: Yesterday at 08:49:08 AM 
Started by xray328 - Last post by xray328
So...660 minutes of flight instruction over 53 flights.  The "usual flight" seemed to be 12 minutes which proved true in the math 660/53=12.45   She received about 8 1/2 hours of ground school.  She trained Sep-Nov 2016 and May-Oct 2017.


(b) CAP has a rule (at least they did as of 10 years ago) that cadets couldn't solo gliders at their first NFA-G. They could only get as far as "supervised solo." Only if they attended a second advanced NFA-G could they actually solo.

Yeah, I'm not sure how that'd work. Looking over the JFA page it says you apply for the NCSA the same way no matter if you have prior glider experience or not and they determine which class you attend based on prior glider experience at the academy (emphasis mine).  So if they placed her in the advanced class (year 2) she'd be with students that flew this last year.  I'm not sure about the solo? Obviously that rules in place so cadets don't solo the first year they attend assuming they are starting with zero flights.  Does that same rule apply to the NGA's?

 24 
 on: Yesterday at 08:40:03 AM 
Started by T8nker - Last post by kwe1009
TBH on exercises the ABUs have proven to be nice because unlike with the BDU, we can see the cadets in the field without having to put orange vests on them.

That probably wasn't the intent of the ABU, but it is a nice benefit since we have it.

It is always nice when you have a cammo pattern that doesn't work on anything.  :)

Honestly, that is the only plus to having the ABU, it stands out when you are in the woods.

 25 
 on: Yesterday at 08:37:31 AM 
Started by kjmillig - Last post by Jester
Another consideration is internet. With paper milestone tests going away, having internet service seems vital. Not to mention the myriad of eservices functions, paperless records being the way to go, access to curriculum and support materials, using google drive, etc.

If it doesnít already have it, are they amenable to having it in their area? 

 26 
 on: Yesterday at 07:38:18 AM 
Started by xray328 - Last post by Flying Pig
I guess I was blessed to learn to fly in So Cal where you could get 30-45 minutes in a 2-33.  When I was flying the Grob 103 Id get 2 hours with no problem.   My longest was 3.5 in a 1-26.  The only reason I came down was because I had to pee like you couldnt believe :) 
Well from the more detailed discussion it sounds like its all on the up and up with the CFI.  I really hope it doesnt discourage her to the point where she loses interest.

 27 
 on: Yesterday at 06:18:08 AM 
Started by xray328 - Last post by mdickinson
So...660 minutes of flight instruction over 53 flights.  The "usual flight" seemed to be 12 minutes which proved true in the math 660/53=12.45   She received about 8 1/2 hours of ground school.  She trained Sep-Nov 2016 and May-Oct 2017.

I instructed at a glider club in a not-quite-zero lift area for several years, and almost all of our flights (in SGS-233s) were 17 minutes. That was from a tow to 3,000 feet AGL. Perhaps your club tows to a lower altitude?

Quote
This all being said, the instruction at the club is free as is use of the glider.  We paid the initiation fee, we pay the tow fee and monthly/yearly dues. Her instructor is very nice and very knowledgeable

Sounds just like my old glider club. The instructor, unpaid, has no financial incentive to delay solo - he just wants her to be safe, and to be able to truthfully sign her log book saying she has the pre-solo aeronautical knowledge. That knowledge hasn't been demonstrated to his satisfaction yet because the ground school, which I'm guessing is given in the open on the field in tiny bits between flights, hasn't been effective (hasn't caused her to learn and retain the material). The problem could be the teaching method, the location, or the half-hour-once-a-week schedule; or she might just not be reviewing the material in between ground school classes.

The 53 flights doesn't strike me as a problem, especially as all this flying is practically free. (Each of those 12 minutes may seem gets kinda pricey when you divide it by the cost of a tow; but they're far less than to the cost of a minute of dual in a C-172 at the local flight school. In my area, a 172 + instructor is now >$3.30 per minute.)

From what you've written it sounds as if the CFIG is just looking for a more thorough understanding of the topics required on the pre-solo aeronautical knowledge. I would suggest she attend a complete glider ground school.

- Maybe you could asking her instructor and/or another club instructor if they could give a ground school course in a classroom (which could be their living room or yours). Could be several students or just her. This would not be as a volunteer instructor at the club, but a paid position. Or perhaps you engage the instructor(s) but then you open it up to other cadets from your squadron (and any other local squadrons). The point is, she learns the theory and other knowledge once and for all, and is then free to proceed to solo.

Attending an NFA-G sounds like it might be great for her - she would get the structured classroom ground school she hasn't gotten at the club. But
(a) everyone else would be on flight 1 and she'd be on flight 54... she'll definitely be ready to solo during the week, and
(b) CAP has a rule (at least they did as of 10 years ago) that cadets couldn't solo gliders at their first NFA-G. They could only get as far as "supervised solo." Only if they attended a second advanced NFA-G could they actually solo.

 28 
 on: Yesterday at 01:08:23 AM 
Started by jfkspotting - Last post by audiododd
If they did that, iíd drop a bid on one. The fun of a tail wheel with the power to actually go somewhere?!  Iím in!!

 29 
 on: Yesterday at 12:05:14 AM 
Started by NIN - Last post by Eclipse
+1

So what's his plan?   Run out the clock?

If the cadet staff can't handle it, then the seniors are supposed to, whether that means
"drive from the backseat", or "take the wheel" is situationally dependent, but you don't
just let the car drift into the ditch.

 30 
 on: Yesterday at 12:03:51 AM 
Started by NIN - Last post by Mordecai
I brought up recruiting to our squadron commander back in late Aug, early Sept. His reply was "I don't think our cadet staff could handle anyone new" Kind of took the wind out of the sails. We do have several new cadets join, the last month, but still, it was them just showing up, no recruiting night like some other squadrons in our Wing. Really heart breaking that our SQD CDR had no trust in our cadet staff

Sometimes it is more than a lack of faith. At times the cadet staff fails to deliver. But the answer there is for the senior staff to step in and help them get in gear while looking for long term solutions. The benefit of recruiting is that you get a bigger pool to get leadership material from.

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