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Angus
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 570
Unit: MA-002

« on: April 04, 2018, 02:30:12 PM »

So I'm working on my Level V and plan on doing the Air Command Staff College I've already been approved just waiting for my college transcript to submit back to them.  But is there anyone here who's taken it that can send me a copy of the reading list?  Figure I'd like to get a head start on some of the reading if at all possible. 
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Maj. Richard J. Walsh, Jr.
SE, ESO, PIO Boston Cadet Squadron
kwe1009
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 915

« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2018, 07:43:11 PM »

Here is the list from the first section.  It is quite a bit.

1
ORIENTATION AND INTRODUCTION
CRITICAL THINKING-CROSS-CULTURAL COMPETENCE
ACSC DISTANCE LEARNING 6.0
BIBLIOGRAPHY
(REQUIRED AND “TO LEARN MORE” MATERIALS ARE LISTED
IN THE ORDER PRESENTED WITHIN THE LESSONS)
Lesson 1 – Orientation and Introduction
Required Learning Material
ACSC. ACSC Distance Learning 6.0 Student Handbook. Maxwell AFB, AL: ACSC-DL, August 2014.
Online Course Structure Overview PowerPoint. Navigating Blackboard Tutorial. SafeAssignment Tutorial. Editing Your Personal Information Tutorial.
Adding an Avatar to Personalize Your Course Environment Tutorial. Setting Your Notification Options Tutorial. Changing Your Password Tutorial.
Replying to a Discussion Board Thread Tutorial
Shea, Virginia. The Core Rules of Netiquette. Available at http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html.
Air University. Academic Integrity OI. 2008.
Rock, Anthony. Academic Freedom Video. Air University Television Video-Lecture. Air University. AU Style Guide. Air University Press, 2005.
Lesson 2 – Why is Critical Thinking Important?
Required Learning Material
Lesson 2 Instructional Narrative (Read All)
Stafford, Matthew. Critical Thinking: Something to Think about. Air University Television Video-Lecture, 28 min., 2012, DVD-WMV.
2
Works Cited
Luft, Gal. Beer, Bacon and Bullets: Culture in Coalition Warfare from Gallipoli to Iraq. Washington, DC: BookSurge, 2009.
Stafford, Matthew. Critical Thinking: Something to Think about. Air University Television Video-Lecture, 28 min., 2012, DVD-WMV.
Lesson 3 – What is Critical Thinking?
Required Learning Material:
Lesson 3 Instructional Narrative (Read All)
Miller, John W. Critical Thinking: An Introduction. Narrator, Charles Catton. Air University Television Video-Lecture, 10 min., 2012, DVD-WMV.
Moore, David T. Critical Thinking & Intelligence Analysis. Ft. McNair, Washington, DC: NDU Press, 2007. pp 52-53.
Gladwell, Malcolm. Blink: The Power of Thinking without Thinking. London: Penguin Books Limited, 2007. pp 148-154.
To Learn More (Optional)
Facione, Peter A.. Critical Thinking: What It Is and Why It Counts. Milbrae, CA: Peter A. Facione, Measured Reasons and the California Academic Press, 2010.
Works Cited
Bacon, Francis, Viscount, St. Albans. The Advancement of Learning, 2nd Ed. London: Macmillan-Clarendon Press, 1859.
Boyd, John, cited in Frans P. B. Osinga. Science, Strategy, and War: The Strategic Theory of John Boyd. (New York: Routledge, 2007. p 230.
Facione, Peter A. Critical Thinking: What It Is and Why It Counts. Milbrae, CA: Peter A. Facione, Measured Reasons and the California Academic Press, 2010.
Fastabend, David A., Brig. Gen, and Robert Simpson, "The Imperative for a Culture of Innovation in the U.S. Army: Adapt or Die," Army Magazine, 54, no. 2 (2004): 9.
3
Gladwell, Malcolm. Blink: The Power of Thinking without Thinking. London: Penguin Books Limited, 2007.
Hofstede, Geert, cited in Malcolm Gladwell. Blink: The Power of Thinking without Thinking. London: Penguin Books Limited, 2007. pp 204.
Illing, Patty and Michael J. Connelly. English 101. “Fact vs. Opinion,” http://cooperseng101.wordpress.com/syllabus-part-2-course-outline/elements-of- powerpoint-design/fact-vs-opinion/ (accessed 19 June 2012).
Langer, Ellen. The Power of Mindful Learning. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books, 1997. Livermore, David. Leading with Cultural Intelligence: The New Secret to Success. New York: AMACOM, 2010.
Luft, Gal. Beer, Bacon and Bullets: Culture in Coalition Warfare from Gallipoli to Iraq. Washington, DC: BookSurge, 2009.
McConnell, Richard , Leonard L. Lira, Ken long, Mark Gerges, and Bill McCollum. “How We Think: Thinking Critically and Creatively and How Military Professionals Can Do It Better,” Small Wars Journal, 16 Sep 2011, http://smallwarsjournal.com/jrnl/art/how-we- think-thinking-critically-and-creatively-and-how-military-professionals-can-do-it-be.
Moore, David T. Critical Thinking & Intelligence Analysis. Ft. McNair, Washington, DC: NDU Press, 2007, 52.
Neuliep, James W.. Intercultural Communication: A Contextual Approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2009.
Miller, John W. Critical Thinking: An Introduction. Narrator, Charles Catton. Air University Television Video-Lecture, 10 min., 2012, DVD-WMV.
Osinga, Frans P. B. Science, Strategy, and War: The Strategic Theory of John Boyd. New York: Routledge, 2007.
Treverton, Gregory, cited in David T. Moore. Occasional Paper No. 14: Critical Thinking and Intelligence Analysis. Washington, DC: NCIC: Center for Strategic Intelligence Research, March 2007. pp 17-18.
Ullman, David. “‘OO-OO-OO!’ The Sound of a Broken OODA Loop.” CrossTalk: The Journal of Defense Software Engineering, April 2007.
Van Gelder, Tim. “Teaching Critical Thinking: Some Lessons from Cognitive Science,” College Teaching 53, no. 1 (2005): 45-46.
Vaughn, Lewis. The Power of Critical Thinking, 3rd Edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.
4
Williams, William Carlos. “The Red Wheelbarrow,” in Chief Modern Poets of Britain and America, eds. Gerald D. Sanders, John Herbert Nelson, and M. L. Rosenthal. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co., 1970. p 158-II.
Lesson 4 – Applying Critical Thinking to Reading
Required Learning Material:
Lesson 4 Instructional Narrative (Read All)
Miller, John W. SQ3R: Applying Critical Thinking to the Reading Process. Narrator, Charles Catton. Air University Television Video-Lecture, 17 min., 2012, DVD-WMV.
Works Cited
Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities. London: Verso, 1991.
Keefer, Louis E. “The Army Specialized Training Program in World War II,” ASTP 3890, Papa’s Web, http://www.pierce-evans.org/ASTP%20in%20WWII.htm (accessed 17 July 2012).
Keefer, Louis E. Scholars in Foxholes: The Story of the Army Specialized Training Program in World War II. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co., 1988.
Miller, John W. SQ3R: Applying Critical Thinking to the Reading Process. Narrator, Charles Catton. Air University Television Video-Lecture, 17 min., 2012, DVD-WMV.
Robinson, Francis P. Effective Study, Revised Edition. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1961. Robinson, Francis P. Effective Study. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1941.
Sticht, Thomas G. “The Reading Formula that Helped Win World War II,” Reading Today, October/November 2002, 18.
Lesson 5 – CT3C: Critical Thinking and Cross-Cultural Competence
Required Learning Material:
Lesson 5 Instructional Narrative (Read All)
Works Cited
AFCLC. Air Force Culture, Region, and Language Flight Plan. Maxwell, AFB: Air Force Culture and Language Center, 2009.
5
AFCLC. Air Force Quality Enhancement Plan: 2009-2014. Maxwell, AFB: Air Force Culture and Language Center, 2009.
AFCLC. Expeditionary Airman Field Guide: Afghanistan. Maxwell AFB, AL: Air Force Culture and Language Center, 2010.
Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities. London: Verso, 1991.
Cushner, K. and R. W. Brislin, excerpted in Douglas B. Rosenthal, Lee Ann Wadsworth, Cheryl Paulin, Amy C. Hooper, and Dharm P.S. Bhawuk. Navigating the Human Terrain: Development of Cross-Cultural Perspective Taking Skills. (Alexandria, VA: US Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, January 2009), C-7
Hofstede, Geert and Gert Jan Hofstede. Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind— Intercultural Cooperation and Its Importance for Survival, Revised and Expended 2nd Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005.
Lawrence, T. E. The Seven Pillars of Wisdom: A Triumph. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Doran, & Co., Inc.
Livermore, David. Leading with Cultural Intelligence: The New Secret to Success. New York: AMACOM, 2010.
Miller, John W. and Lauren Mackenzie. “The Seventh Sense: Understanding Cultural Differences.” In Expeditionary Leadership Coursebook. Maxwell AFB, AL: Squadron Officer College OLMP Course, 2010.
Ogami, Noriko. Cold Water: Intercultural Adjustment and Values Conflict of Foreign Students and Scholars at an American University, Intercultural Press Video, 48 min., 1988, DVD.
Osinga, Frans P. B.. Science, Strategy, and War: The Strategic Theory of John Boyd. New York: Routledge, 2007.
Samovar, Larry A., Richard E. Porter, and Edwin R. McDaniel. Communication between Cultures. (Boston, MA: Wadsworth, 2010), 215.
Triandis, Harry C. “Cultural Influences and Personality,” Annual Review of Psychology, 57 (2002).
Williams, Raymond. “Film and the Dramatic Tradition,” in The Raymond Williams Reader, ed. J. Higgins. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, Ltd., 2001: 25-41.
Williams, Raymond. Keywords. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976, 76.
Zinni, Tony, Gen. The Battle for Peace: A Frontline Vision of America’s Power and Purpose. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
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Angus
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 570
Unit: MA-002

« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2018, 12:38:15 PM »

Thanks.
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Maj. Richard J. Walsh, Jr.
SE, ESO, PIO Boston Cadet Squadron
THRAWN
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,867

« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2018, 09:54:37 AM »

Good list. Just be cautious doing read aheads. You might find yourself spending a lot of time reading material that is no longer required (due to a version change) or material that is completely out of context. Get familiar with how the readings are set up, but don't sped too much time trying to get ahead. Check that the versions listed are still the current materials. Good luck! It's a great course and I still use some of the lessons in my work life.

Just some advice:
1. Make a schedule and STICK TO IT. There is a temptation to "put it off tomorrow". Don't.
2. Put the audio material on your phone or listen to it in the car. I had a 45 minute commute, so I got a lot of "study" done in the car.
3. Draft your responses and papers. Put them in a drawer for a day, and then go back and read them. Make edits as necessary but don't try to bang written material out in one sitting. You'll find that a lot of it is asinine when you read it back.
4. Get to know the people in your cohort. If you have group work or have to have discussions, use Skype. It works better than group emails.

Again, have fun!
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Strup
"Belligerent....at times...."
AFRCC SMC 10-97
NSS ISC 05-00
USAF SOS 2000
USAF ACSC 2011
US NWC 2016
shuman14
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 955
Unit: NHQ-996

« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2018, 04:33:11 PM »

Question, does CAP get any seats to the Resident (i.e. in person) Air Command Staff College?
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Joseph J. Clune
Major (Promotable), Military Police

USMCR: 1990 - 1992                           USAR: 1993 -1998, 2000 - Present     CAP (National Patron) 2013 - Present
INARNG: 1992 - 1993, 1998 - 2000       USCGAux: 2004 - Present
MSG Mac
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,883
Unit: MER-MD-071

« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2018, 04:51:01 PM »

Question, does CAP get any seats to the Resident (i.e. in person) Air Command Staff College?

That was addressed at the Winter Boards "Questions from the Field"

CAP members and USAF members are now able to cross-talk during the distance learning options for SOS, ACSC and AWC because those courses have changed how they approach distance learning. So, in a way, there is more cross-participation.   These courses do not contain classified information. Those electives that do require clearances are barred from CAP members.
 
If the question is ‘can CAP members participate in the in-residence courses such as SOS or ACSC,’ unfortunately the answer is ‘not at this time.’  There are several reasons for this including cost versus the benefit to the Air Force, that security clearances are required for in-residence participation for some activities, and the relative expense to the CAP student even if the Air Force agreed to slot a CAP member.  Assuming a member could stay on base, the cost for food and lodging would be over $100/day. That would be $5,600 just to be at Maxwell AFB for SOS and almost $30,000 for ACSC.
 
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Michael P. McEleney
Lt Col CAP
MSG USA (Retired)
shuman14
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 955
Unit: NHQ-996

« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2018, 06:45:20 PM »

LTC McEleney,

Do you know if the USAFR has a similar NCOES like the USAR?

For example a Soldier back in the day used to have do six months to a year of correspondence courses and then go to a two week in-residence for PLDC, BNCOC, and ANCOC. Not sure how the First Sergeant Course and the  Sergeant Major Academy worked, I'd switched to the Officer side long before I had to worry about that.

I know the correspondence courses (the old yellow books) are long gone and are rolled into the SSD (Structured Self Development) that the Troops have to complete online now.

If the USAFR does have a program like that, you would think a CAP member could do the online portions and a two week in-residence might be economically feasible for the average CAP member.

I'm sure there are CAP members that are "independently wealthy" and could afford the five to thirty thousand to do the active duty schools... but that number isn't going to be very big.
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Joseph J. Clune
Major (Promotable), Military Police

USMCR: 1990 - 1992                           USAR: 1993 -1998, 2000 - Present     CAP (National Patron) 2013 - Present
INARNG: 1992 - 1993, 1998 - 2000       USCGAux: 2004 - Present
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,145

« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2018, 08:28:26 PM »

LTC McEleney,

Do you know if the USAFR has a similar NCOES like the USAR?

For example a Soldier back in the day used to have do six months to a year of correspondence courses and then go to a two week in-residence for PLDC, BNCOC, and ANCOC. Not sure how the First Sergeant Course and the  Sergeant Major Academy worked, I'd switched to the Officer side long before I had to worry about that.

I know the correspondence courses (the old yellow books) are long gone and are rolled into the SSD (Structured Self Development) that the Troops have to complete online now.

If the USAFR does have a program like that, you would think a CAP member could do the online portions and a two week in-residence might be economically feasible for the average CAP member.

I'm sure there are CAP members that are "independently wealthy" and could afford the five to thirty thousand to do the active duty schools... but that number isn't going to be very big.

Shuman, Air Force Enlisted PME is not structured like Army PME at all. You're trying to compare apples to watermelons.
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shuman14
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 955
Unit: NHQ-996

« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2018, 03:12:07 PM »

Quote
Shuman, Air Force Enlisted PME is not structured like Army PME at all. You're trying to compare apples to watermelons.

Actually, I'm asking, not comparing, because I don't know. I was asking MSGMac, as a former USA NCO, because he would understand the Army PME.

Can you, in a cliff-notes version, explain how the USAFR/AFNG conduct their NCO Education System?
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Joseph J. Clune
Major (Promotable), Military Police

USMCR: 1990 - 1992                           USAR: 1993 -1998, 2000 - Present     CAP (National Patron) 2013 - Present
INARNG: 1992 - 1993, 1998 - 2000       USCGAux: 2004 - Present
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,145

« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2018, 03:34:38 PM »

Quote
Shuman, Air Force Enlisted PME is not structured like Army PME at all. You're trying to compare apples to watermelons.

Actually, I'm asking, not comparing, because I don't know. I was asking MSGMac, as a former USA NCO, because he would understand the Army PME.

Can you, in a cliff-notes version, explain how the USAFR/AFNG conduct their NCO Education System?

The same way the Air Force does. The only exception being that AFRC and ANG are allowed to do stuff like NCO Academy and SNCO Academy by correspondence.
The active duty normally is required to complete those schools in residence. AFRC and ANG have the option to do them either in residence or by correspondence depending on the member's availability, school tour availability and training funds availability.
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shuman14
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 955
Unit: NHQ-996

« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2018, 03:44:28 PM »

Quote
The same way the Air Force does. The only exception being that AFRC and ANG are allowed to do stuff like NCO Academy and SNCO Academy by correspondence.
The active duty normally is required to complete those schools in residence. AFRC and ANG have the option to do them either in residence or by correspondence depending on the member's availability, school tour availability and training funds availability.

So it's all correspondence or all in residence? Interesting. Well I mean it affords those who have the time the opportunity to attend the same schools as their AC counterparts, which is good, but limited by funding.

I wonder if that's intentional to slow promotions within the USAFR and AFNG? Can AC Airmen elect to do the correspondence or are they required to do the in residence classes?
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Joseph J. Clune
Major (Promotable), Military Police

USMCR: 1990 - 1992                           USAR: 1993 -1998, 2000 - Present     CAP (National Patron) 2013 - Present
INARNG: 1992 - 1993, 1998 - 2000       USCGAux: 2004 - Present
kwe1009
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 915

« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2018, 05:44:24 PM »

USAF Enlisted Professional Military Education (PME) has both in residence and correspondence options at each level.  For each course a person has 12+ months to complete and they can do it well in advance of actually needing it for promotion.

For example the SNCO course is required to pin on Senior Master Sergeant.  I took it when I was a TSgt. 

It is very similar on the officer side so there is plenty of time for both AD, Guard, and Reserve to take the required PME either in person or correspondence before needing it for promotion.
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MSG Mac
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,883
Unit: MER-MD-071

« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2018, 08:27:47 PM »

LTC McEleney,

Do you know if the USAFR has a similar NCOES like the USAR?

For example a Soldier back in the day used to have do six months to a year of correspondence courses and then go to a two week in-residence for PLDC, BNCOC, and ANCOC. Not sure how the First Sergeant Course and the  Sergeant Major Academy worked, I'd switched to the Officer side long before I had to worry about that.

I know the correspondence courses (the old yellow books) are long gone and are rolled into the SSD (Structured Self Development) that the Troops have to complete online now.

If the USAFR does have a program like that, you would think a CAP member could do the online portions and a two week in-residence might be economically feasible for the average CAP member.

I'm sure there are CAP members that are "independently wealthy" and could afford the five to thirty thousand to do the active duty schools... but that number isn't going to be very big.

Major Shuman

I have been out for more than 10 years (and two uniform iterations). My knowledge of the Army NCODP is obsolete. When I was in I had to take all my NCO Courses in person.
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Michael P. McEleney
Lt Col CAP
MSG USA (Retired)
PHall
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 6,145

« Reply #13 on: April 09, 2018, 11:40:54 PM »

Quote
The same way the Air Force does. The only exception being that AFRC and ANG are allowed to do stuff like NCO Academy and SNCO Academy by correspondence.
The active duty normally is required to complete those schools in residence. AFRC and ANG have the option to do them either in residence or by correspondence depending on the member's availability, school tour availability and training funds availability.

So it's all correspondence or all in residence? Interesting. Well I mean it affords those who have the time the opportunity to attend the same schools as their AC counterparts, which is good, but limited by funding.

I wonder if that's intentional to slow promotions within the USAFR and AFNG? Can AC Airmen elect to do the correspondence or are they required to do the in residence classes?

The Enlisted Promotion system in AFRC and the ANG are totally different from the system the Active Duty uses.
Every enlisted position in the Air Force, to include AFRC and the ANG has a maximum grade attached to it.
In the AFRC and ANG there are two ways to get promoted.
Unit Vacancy - there is a slot available in your AFSC in your unit for the grade you are trying to promote to available. If you have completed all of the required PME, have the required Time in Grade and Time in Service and have the required skill level in your AFSC you can be promoted.
The other way is a STEP (STripes for Exceptional Performers) promotion. This is a competitive promotion where you can be promoted to one grade above the grade for your slot.
Unit Vacancy promotions are the "normal" way most people are promoted.

Active Duty airmen can do the correspondence courses if their unit can get them a waiver. Normally done where the Airman is not available to attend due to stuff like back to back deployments and such. 
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shuman14
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 955
Unit: NHQ-996

« Reply #14 on: April 11, 2018, 06:09:39 PM »

Thank you all for the good information.

CAP members can sign up for the all correspondence courses for the USAF NCOES correct?
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Joseph J. Clune
Major (Promotable), Military Police

USMCR: 1990 - 1992                           USAR: 1993 -1998, 2000 - Present     CAP (National Patron) 2013 - Present
INARNG: 1992 - 1993, 1998 - 2000       USCGAux: 2004 - Present
Eclipse
Too Much Free Time Award

Posts: 28,764

« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2018, 06:35:18 PM »

CAP members can sign up for the all correspondence courses for the USAF NCOES correct?

No.
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kwe1009
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 915

« Reply #16 on: April 11, 2018, 06:52:33 PM »

Thank you all for the good information.

CAP members can sign up for the all correspondence courses for the USAF NCOES correct?

CAP NCOs can take the Air Force NCOA or SNCOA via correspondence as long as they meet the rank requirements. 

CAP Officers can can SOS, ACSC, or AWC if they have a bachelor's degree and meet the rank requirements.

The Air Force calls their enlisted training Professional Military Education (PME) also.

More information about any of this can be found at https://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/members/cap-university/au-a4-6-students-usaf-dl/
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shuman14
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 955
Unit: NHQ-996

« Reply #17 on: April 13, 2018, 01:38:30 PM »

Learning a lot, thank you all again.
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Joseph J. Clune
Major (Promotable), Military Police

USMCR: 1990 - 1992                           USAR: 1993 -1998, 2000 - Present     CAP (National Patron) 2013 - Present
INARNG: 1992 - 1993, 1998 - 2000       USCGAux: 2004 - Present
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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Membership  |  Topic: Air Command Staff College
 


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