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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Hysterical History  |  Topic: What is the shortlist of significant CAP history events after WWII?
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Author Topic: What is the shortlist of significant CAP history events after WWII?  (Read 1362 times)
Yochanan
Recruit

Posts: 18
Unit: SER-AL-117

« on: April 18, 2017, 01:20:29 PM »

That is, aside from becoming a USAF auxiliary.
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Chappie
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Posts: 1,053

« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2017, 01:54:05 PM »

The change of governance in the organization with the establishment of the board of governors by federal law in 2001.

Silly me...forgot to include the establishment of the CAP Chaplain Corps on January 5, 1950....you can thank Gill Robb Wilson for his vision to see this accomplished.   In early 1949 Gill Robb Wilson and Major General Lucas V. Beau, USAF and Brigadier General Harold Byrd, CAP urged the US Air Force Chief of Chaplains to establish CAP Chaplaincy and organize the CAP Chaplain Service even to station an USAF Chaplain to CAP, to function in oversight. The first National Air Chaplain appointed by the USAF to serve CAP was Ch,  Lt Col Robert Taylor.  Ch Taylor was a survivor of the Bataan Death March and was awarded the Silver Star.  He appointed in 1962 to Chief of the USAF Chaplain Service (the 3rd chief and was promoted to Maj Gen...retiring in 1966).   From 1950-2001, the CAP Chaplain Corps was under the oversight of an assigned USAF Chaplain.  In 2002, a paid Deputy Director was hired to provide oversight.   The position and funding was eliminated by the CAP Corporation in 2005 with the daily oversight handed over to the volunteer side of house.  The Chief of the CAP Chaplain Corps (volunteer) now is responsible for the day-to-day operation and oversight of the Chaplain Corps.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2017, 02:22:15 PM by Chappie » Logged
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THRAWN
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,809

« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2017, 02:14:51 PM »

Pick a natural or man made disaster that's happened since then. Andrew, Gustav, Katrina, Sandy, ice storms in the northeast, floods in Missouri, 9/11, Deepwater Horizon....add to that the use of CAP assets during real world training for the military that ranges from acting as civilian evacuees during joint SOF exercises on Ft Dix to the Green Flag exercises...Space Shuttle recovery, the JFK Jr SAR mission....lots of stuff...
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Strup
"Belligerent....at times...."
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Chappie
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,053

« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2017, 02:21:26 PM »

Pick a natural or man made disaster that's happened since then. Andrew, Gustav, Katrina, Sandy, ice storms in the northeast, floods in Missouri, 9/11, Deepwater Horizon....add to that the use of CAP assets during real world training for the military that ranges from acting as civilian evacuees during joint SOF exercises on Ft Dix to the Green Flag exercises...Space Shuttle recovery, the JFK Jr SAR mission....lots of stuff...

Steve Fossett search.
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Eclipse
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« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2017, 02:25:16 PM »

NIN got to wear those sweet non-compliant pickle suits!
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sardak
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,144

« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2017, 02:33:23 PM »

USAF Capt. Craig Button A-10 search. 20 years ago this month.

Mike
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MisterCD
Forum Regular

Posts: 160

« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2017, 02:34:56 PM »

This may be of interest: http://history.cap.gov/files/original/e2fdf35b1a87c647ba2bcf3fe34207e5.pdf
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NIN
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Unit: of issue

« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2017, 04:49:20 PM »

NIN got to wear those sweet non-compliant pickle suits!

They were compliant at the time.

If you mean this

which is the "pickle suit."

Versus this

which are "jungle fatigues."
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Darin Ninness, Lt Col, CAP
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RiverAux
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« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2017, 04:52:15 PM »

Doesn't matter..... just about all mention of CAP history ends shortly after WWII

Case in point, the history of CAP as published on our own web page as presented to the general public: http://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/about/
Quote
In the late 1930s, more than 150,000 volunteers with a love for aviation argued for an organization to put their planes and flying skills to use in defense of their country.  As a result, the Civil Air Patrol was born one week prior to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  Thousands of volunteer members answered America's call to national service and sacrifice by accepting and performing critical wartime missions. Assigned to the War Department under the jurisdiction of the Army Air Corps, the contributions of Civil Air Patrol, including logging more than 500,000 flying hours and saving hundreds of crash victims during World War II, are well documented.

After the war, a thankful nation understood that Civil Air Patrol could continue providing valuable services to both local and national agencies.  On July 1, 1946, President Harry Truman signed Public Law 476 incorporating Civil Air Patrol as a benevolent, nonprofit organization.  On May 26, 1948, Congress passed Public Law 557 permanently establishing Civil Air Patrol as the auxiliary of the new U.S. Air Force.  Three primary mission areas were set forth at that time: aerospace education, cadet programs, and emergency services. 
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AirAux
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« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2017, 10:07:02 AM »

Where does one start?  An example, 1962, local airport.  Penny a pound rides.  Cap members flew their own aircraft to support CAP.  I paid $1.22 for a 15 minute ride in a Cherokee 140.  I was introduced to CAP.  I became a Cadet.  We met at Truax Filed in an F-89 hanger with the jets right there, often with airmen working on them during our meetings.  I don't believe there were any Corporate aircraft back then.  Went to encampment for 10 days at Chanute AFB.  Flew down and back in the back of a C-119 (National Guard flight).  While at Chanute, we did orientation flights in a C-47  and I got to fly the beautiful bird for 10 minutes or so.  We ate at the mess hall and slept in barracks.  We wore Khaki's for everything except PT.  I know it may not be historical, but it does reflect a lot of change in CAP and how we recruited members back in the day.  It also reflects the separation between the Air Force and CAP.  We were their little brothers back then and they loved us.  Now we are all grown up and expected to do for ourselves.  (With their money of course)  I kind of liked the old CAP/Air Force and our relationship.   
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Spaceman3750
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Posts: 2,620

« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2017, 10:26:48 AM »

Where does one start?  An example, 1962, local airport.  Penny a pound rides.  Cap members flew their own aircraft to support CAP.  I paid $1.22 for a 15 minute ride in a Cherokee 140.  I was introduced to CAP.  I became a Cadet.  We met at Truax Filed in an F-89 hanger with the jets right there, often with airmen working on them during our meetings.  I don't believe there were any Corporate aircraft back then.  Went to encampment for 10 days at Chanute AFB.  Flew down and back in the back of a C-119 (National Guard flight).  While at Chanute, we did orientation flights in a C-47  and I got to fly the beautiful bird for 10 minutes or so.  We ate at the mess hall and slept in barracks.  We wore Khaki's for everything except PT.  I know it may not be historical, but it does reflect a lot of change in CAP and how we recruited members back in the day.  It also reflects the separation between the Air Force and CAP.  We were their little brothers back then and they loved us.  Now we are all grown up and expected to do for ourselves.  (With their money of course)  I kind of liked the old CAP/Air Force and our relationship.   

Now we have 600 corporate aircraft so we don't have to rely on the benevolence of individual members. Thousands of corporate vehicles. And other things which make life a lot easier.

While the things you described have a high cool-factor, I can't build an ES or orientation flight program around airplanes that may or may not show up based on whether or not Jim Bob is available.

Military orientation flights are still very much a thing, but there's more rules on the AF side and therefore it's more work. CAP isn't the only one that has changed - we live in a stricter world with more oversight, which means that things are still available but you just have to follow the right path to get them.

And CAP still gets treated like little brother in a lot of places (especially with the Guard). What you describe was probably as much or more local relationships than national paradigm.
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The moment any commander or staff member considers themselves a gatekeeper, instead of a facilitator, they have failed at their job.
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Eclipse
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« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2017, 11:01:36 AM »

Where does one start?  An example, 1962, local airport.  Penny a pound rides.  Cap members flew their own aircraft to support CAP.  I paid $1.22 for a 15 minute ride in a Cherokee 140.  I was introduced to CAP.  I became a Cadet.  We met at Truax Filed in an F-89 hanger with the jets right there, often with airmen working on them during our meetings.  I don't believe there were any Corporate aircraft back then.  Went to encampment for 10 days at Chanute AFB.  Flew down and back in the back of a C-119 (National Guard flight).  While at Chanute, we did orientation flights in a C-47  and I got to fly the beautiful bird for 10 minutes or so.  We ate at the mess hall and slept in barracks.  We wore Khaki's for everything except PT.  I know it may not be historical, but it does reflect a lot of change in CAP and how we recruited members back in the day.  It also reflects the separation between the Air Force and CAP.  We were their little brothers back then and they loved us.  Now we are all grown up and expected to do for ourselves.  (With their money of course)  I kind of liked the old CAP/Air Force and our relationship.   

Weren't the good old days so much better?  Life was simpler, easier, CAP was so much higher speed, and the AF loved us.
Today the reason things like this don't happen as often must be because the relationship has soured, like unpasturized milk
from the "good old days".

FYI - there's a lot less "Air Force" to go around...a LOT less.

There is no Chanute, O'Hare, Glenview, nor for that matter 1/3-1/2 the bases that hosted activities for CAP, nor the Airmen and Officers who
were members, nor the money sitting on the ramps unused that justified the ease of access in the first place.

CAP members still have great encampments, eat in mess halls and sleep in barracks every year.  They also do get orientation
rides in cargo aircraft, fuelers, helos, and other aircraft, all the time, probably in about the same proportion to the
actual membership as before.

However thankfully for the people under the planes, cadets aren't allowed to fly them anymore, because OMG, seriously?

And as for using MOAs to support CAP?  Yeah, those don't exist anymore either, nor the airports.
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"The man who does more than he is paid for will soon be paid for more than he does." - Napoleon Hill.
The contents of this post are Copyright © 2017 by eclipse. All rights are reserved. Specific permission is given to quote this post here on CAP-Talk only.

waukwiz
Member

Posts: 66
Unit: GLR-WI-048

« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2017, 09:46:10 AM »

However thankfully for the people under the planes, cadets aren't allowed to fly them anymore, because OMG, seriously?

Are you sure of that, sir? I thought that 18+ cadets could serve as MPs?

Never mind. Re-read and understood.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2017, 09:51:37 AM by waukwiz » Logged
Cadet Cullen Mayes
Waukesha Composite Squadron
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Pylon
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Michael Kieloch, Marketing Communications & PR Leadership
« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2017, 12:34:19 PM »

February 6, 2005 — CAPTalk was founded.  8)
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Michael F. Kieloch, Maj, CAP
Concord Composite Squadron, NH       
THRAWN
Salty & Seasoned Contributor

Posts: 1,809

« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2017, 01:07:17 PM »

February 6, 2005 — CAPTalk was founded.  8)

Now there's a guy that wants to keep his job.... 8)
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Strup
"Belligerent....at times...."
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CAP Talk  |  General Discussion  |  Hysterical History  |  Topic: What is the shortlist of significant CAP history events after WWII?
 


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