December 07, 2022, 10:24:05 pm

Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters Question 2

Started by James Shaw, May 14, 2021, 12:21:07 pm

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Are individual KSA's easier to transition and utilize in the:

Civil Air Patrol
0 (0%)
Coast Guard Auxiliary
3 (50%)
State Defense Forces
0 (0%)
Other (Local Only)
0 (0%)
None
1 (16.7%)
Do not have any experience with other VOADS
2 (33.3%)

Total Members Voted: 6

Voting closed: May 21, 2021, 12:21:07 pm

James Shaw

Are individual KSA's easier to transition and utilize in the:?

If you have experience, certifications, academic training in a specific field are they utilized or transferrable with greater ease in.....
Jim Shaw
USN: 1987-1992
GANG: 1996-1998
CAP:2000 - Current
USCGA:2018 - Current
SGAUS: 2017 - Current

baronet68

I'd love to answer this question however, I have no idea what a KSA is supposed to be.

A general rule of thumb for acronyms is to write out the full name when first mentioned (with the acronym in parentheses).
Michael Moore, Maj, CAP
National Recruiting & Retention Manager

James Shaw

Quote from: baronet68 on May 15, 2021, 04:47:57 amI'd love to answer this question however, I have no idea what a KSA is supposed to be.

A general rule of thumb for acronyms is to write out the full name when first mentioned (with the acronym in parentheses).


Sorry for the acronym "Knowledge, Skill, Ability"
Jim Shaw
USN: 1987-1992
GANG: 1996-1998
CAP:2000 - Current
USCGA:2018 - Current
SGAUS: 2017 - Current

etodd

Interesting question. I know when I joined CAP with over 1000 hours of pilot time over a few decades, I was told "we start from scratch and evaluate you and teach you the CAP way of flying".

Would it not be the same most anywhere, with any skill sets?  The next organization thinks they have the best methods of this and that, and will insist you do it their way.

"Don't try to explain it, just bow your head
Breathe in, breathe out, move on ..."

TheSkyHornet

Quote from: etodd on May 15, 2021, 08:36:42 pmI know when I joined CAP with over 1000 hours of pilot time over a few decades, I was told "we start from scratch and evaluate you and teach you the CAP way of flying".

I think it really depends on who's teaching you. This applies to many areas, not just CAP.

A lot of people have the myth that the military hates taking existing pilots because they have to undo bad habits and teach you "their way." If that was the case, they wouldn't have non-fliers go to an introductory flight school first. It's always easier to take someone with an existing school and re-teach them fundamentals to remove the rust and grease up the gears.

A good instructor will understand the time necessity balanced against the quality necessity. Sure, zero-to-hero training may provide you with the "my way" quality you might be looking for, but it's going to take longer (in most cases) to get that student signed off because you're having to teach them everything without any prior real-world experience or practical application of the subject matter.

This showcases the importance of having a standardized program curriculum. The entire organization should be training the fundamentals the same way with, perhaps, some focus items based on locale. It's not like I can practice high-altitude mountain flying where I live, and my butt would be charred if I tried to start flying the Rockies based on my flight experience.

James Shaw

Civil Air Patrol0 (0%)
Coast Guard Auxiliary3 (50%)
State Defense Forces0 (0%)
Other (Local Only)0 (0%)
None1 (16.7%)
Do not have any experience with other VOADS2 (33.3%)
Total Members Voted: 6
Jim Shaw
USN: 1987-1992
GANG: 1996-1998
CAP:2000 - Current
USCGA:2018 - Current
SGAUS: 2017 - Current